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Title: Advances in coiled-tubing operating systems

Abstract

The expansion of coiled tubing (CT) applications into spooled flowlines, spooled completions, and CT drilling continues to grow at an accelerated rate. For many users within the oil and gas industry, the CT industry appears to be poised on the threshold of the next logical step in its evolution, the creation of a fully integrated operating system. However, for CT to evolve into such an operating system, the associated services must be robust and sufficiently reliable to support the needs of exploration, development drilling, completion, production management, and wellbore-retirement operations both technically and economically. The most critical hurdle to overcome in creating a CT-based operating system is a fundamental understanding of the operating scope and physical limitations of CT technology. The complete list of mechanisms required to advance CT into an operating system is large and complex. However, a few key issues (such as formal education, training, standardization, and increased levels of experience) can accelerate the transition. These factors are discussed.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. SAS Industries, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
504916
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: JPT, Journal of Petroleum Technology; Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Jun 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 02 PETROLEUM; FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT; TUBES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; OIL WELLS; NATURAL GAS WELLS; WELL DRILLING; WELL COMPLETION; PRODUCTION; OPERATION

Citation Formats

Sas-Jaworsky, A. II. Advances in coiled-tubing operating systems. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Sas-Jaworsky, A. II. Advances in coiled-tubing operating systems. United States.
Sas-Jaworsky, A. II. 1997. "Advances in coiled-tubing operating systems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_504916,
title = {Advances in coiled-tubing operating systems},
author = {Sas-Jaworsky, A. II},
abstractNote = {The expansion of coiled tubing (CT) applications into spooled flowlines, spooled completions, and CT drilling continues to grow at an accelerated rate. For many users within the oil and gas industry, the CT industry appears to be poised on the threshold of the next logical step in its evolution, the creation of a fully integrated operating system. However, for CT to evolve into such an operating system, the associated services must be robust and sufficiently reliable to support the needs of exploration, development drilling, completion, production management, and wellbore-retirement operations both technically and economically. The most critical hurdle to overcome in creating a CT-based operating system is a fundamental understanding of the operating scope and physical limitations of CT technology. The complete list of mechanisms required to advance CT into an operating system is large and complex. However, a few key issues (such as formal education, training, standardization, and increased levels of experience) can accelerate the transition. These factors are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {JPT, Journal of Petroleum Technology},
number = 6,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month = 6
}
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