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Title: Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

Abstract

Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5028168
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 5028168
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. Rev. Respir. Dis.; (United States); Journal Volume: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BACTERIA; PHAGOCYTOSIS; MACROPHAGES; CYTOCHEMISTRY; TUMOR CELLS; SENSITIVITY; ANTIGENS; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; BRONCHI; CHROMIUM 51; GUINEA PIGS; IMMUNE REACTIONS; INFECTIVITY; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; METHIONINE; MICE; PNEUMONIA; PROTEINS; SELENIUM 75; TOXICITY; TRACER TECHNIQUES; AMINO ACIDS; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BIOCHEMISTRY; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHEMISTRY; CHROMIUM ISOTOPES; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DISEASES; DRUGS; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; KINETICS; LIPOTROPIC FACTORS; MAMMALS; MICROORGANISMS; NUCLEI; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS; PHAGOCYTES; RADIOISOTOPES; REACTION KINETICS; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM DISEASES; RODENTS; SELENIUM ISOTOPES; SOMATIC CELLS; VERTEBRATES 550901* -- Pathology-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Kist, M., Koester, H., and Bredt, W. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Kist, M., Koester, H., & Bredt, W. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells. United States.
Kist, M., Koester, H., and Bredt, W. Sat . "Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5028168,
title = {Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells},
author = {Kist, M. and Koester, H. and Bredt, W.},
abstractNote = {Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.},
doi = {},
journal = {Am. Rev. Respir. Dis.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1985},
month = {Sat Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1985}
}
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