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Title: Water vapor conductance and CO/sub 2/ uptake for leaves of a C/sub 4/ desert grass, Hilaria rigida

Abstract

Availability of soil water was the major influence on seasonal stomatal activity of Hilaria rigida (Thurb.) Benth. ex Scibn. over a 2-yr study period in the Colorado desert section of the Sonoran desert. Major stomatal opening (water vapor conductance >2 mm/s) occurred for 4.6 mo in the relatively cool winter-spring (maximum daytime temperatures averaging 17/sup 0/C) and for 1.7 mo in the late summer-early fall (maximum daytime temperature averaging 31/sup 0/C). The temperature optimum for CO/sub 2/ uptake was generally above daytime temperatures, particularly in the winter. When the daytime growth temperature was raised from 16/sup 0/ to 49/sup 0/C in laboratory experiments, the temperature optimum for CO/sub 2/ uptake shifted from 29/sup 0/ to 43/sup 0/C. Besides the rather high temperature optimum for CO/sub 2/ uptake, H. rigida displayed other typical C/sub 4/ characteristics including Kranz anatomy, a low CO/sub 2/ compensation point (12 ..mu..1/1), and a lack of light saturation of CO/sub 2/ uptake at full sunlight. Under optimal field conditions, the CO/sub 2/ uptake rate can be 67 ..mu..mol.m/sup -2/.s/sup -1/ (106 mg CO/sub 2/.dm/sup -2/.h/sup -1/), higher than has been reported for any other species. The accompanying high water use efficiency (mass CO/sub 2/ taken upmore » by leaf blades/mass H/sub 2/O lost) may help explain the success of this hardy grass in both the Mojave and Sonoran deserts.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles
OSTI Identifier:
5024943
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AM03-76-SF00012
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Ecology; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 61:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; METABOLISM; GRASS; TOLERANCE; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; TEMPERATURE EFFECTS; TRANSPIRATION; WATER VAPOR; ABSORPTIVITY; CARBON; CLIMATES; DESERTS; ECOLOGY; LEAVES; PHYSIOLOGY; PLANT CELLS; STOMATA; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; TIME DEPENDENCE; UPTAKE; VISIBLE RADIATION; ARID LANDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ECOSYSTEMS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GASES; NONMETALS; OPENINGS; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; PLANTS; RADIATIONS; SYNTHESIS; VAPORS; 550200* - Biochemistry; 551000 - Physiological Systems

Citation Formats

Nobel, P S. Water vapor conductance and CO/sub 2/ uptake for leaves of a C/sub 4/ desert grass, Hilaria rigida. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Nobel, P S. Water vapor conductance and CO/sub 2/ uptake for leaves of a C/sub 4/ desert grass, Hilaria rigida. United States.
Nobel, P S. Tue . "Water vapor conductance and CO/sub 2/ uptake for leaves of a C/sub 4/ desert grass, Hilaria rigida". United States.
@article{osti_5024943,
title = {Water vapor conductance and CO/sub 2/ uptake for leaves of a C/sub 4/ desert grass, Hilaria rigida},
author = {Nobel, P S},
abstractNote = {Availability of soil water was the major influence on seasonal stomatal activity of Hilaria rigida (Thurb.) Benth. ex Scibn. over a 2-yr study period in the Colorado desert section of the Sonoran desert. Major stomatal opening (water vapor conductance >2 mm/s) occurred for 4.6 mo in the relatively cool winter-spring (maximum daytime temperatures averaging 17/sup 0/C) and for 1.7 mo in the late summer-early fall (maximum daytime temperature averaging 31/sup 0/C). The temperature optimum for CO/sub 2/ uptake was generally above daytime temperatures, particularly in the winter. When the daytime growth temperature was raised from 16/sup 0/ to 49/sup 0/C in laboratory experiments, the temperature optimum for CO/sub 2/ uptake shifted from 29/sup 0/ to 43/sup 0/C. Besides the rather high temperature optimum for CO/sub 2/ uptake, H. rigida displayed other typical C/sub 4/ characteristics including Kranz anatomy, a low CO/sub 2/ compensation point (12 ..mu..1/1), and a lack of light saturation of CO/sub 2/ uptake at full sunlight. Under optimal field conditions, the CO/sub 2/ uptake rate can be 67 ..mu..mol.m/sup -2/.s/sup -1/ (106 mg CO/sub 2/.dm/sup -2/.h/sup -1/), higher than has been reported for any other species. The accompanying high water use efficiency (mass CO/sub 2/ taken up by leaf blades/mass H/sub 2/O lost) may help explain the success of this hardy grass in both the Mojave and Sonoran deserts.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5024943}, journal = {Ecology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 61:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {4}
}