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Title: Lead in soils and plants: its relationship to traffic volume and proximity to highways

Abstract

Soils and plants sampled along heavily traveled highways show that lead contents tend to increase with traffic volume and decrease with distance from the highway. Much of the lead was present as a removable surface contamination on the plants. The major effect of traffic was limited to the surface soil and to a narrow zone within 100 feet of the highway. Plants grown in the field contained the most lead in the aerial portion and those grown in the greenhouse had the most lead in the roots. These studies indicate plants may obtain lead through both leaves and roots with little translocation within the plant. The fruiting and flowering parts of plants contained the smallest amounts of lead and showed little effect of changes in amounts of lead supplied. 19 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, New Brunswick
OSTI Identifier:
5017669
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; LEAD; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; PLANTS; CONTAMINATION; SOILS; AIR POLLUTION; AUTOMOBILES; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; EXHAUST GASES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; LEAVES; POLLUTION SOURCES; ROOTS; SAMPLING; DATA; DISTRIBUTION; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GASEOUS WASTES; GASES; INFORMATION; MASS TRANSFER; METALS; NUMERICAL DATA; POLLUTION; VEHICLES; WASTES; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987); 510200 - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 500200 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Motto, H L, Daines, R H, Chilko, D M, and Motto, C K. Lead in soils and plants: its relationship to traffic volume and proximity to highways. United States: N. p., 1970. Web. doi:10.1021/es60038a009.
Motto, H L, Daines, R H, Chilko, D M, & Motto, C K. Lead in soils and plants: its relationship to traffic volume and proximity to highways. United States. doi:10.1021/es60038a009.
Motto, H L, Daines, R H, Chilko, D M, and Motto, C K. Sun . "Lead in soils and plants: its relationship to traffic volume and proximity to highways". United States. doi:10.1021/es60038a009.
@article{osti_5017669,
title = {Lead in soils and plants: its relationship to traffic volume and proximity to highways},
author = {Motto, H L and Daines, R H and Chilko, D M and Motto, C K},
abstractNote = {Soils and plants sampled along heavily traveled highways show that lead contents tend to increase with traffic volume and decrease with distance from the highway. Much of the lead was present as a removable surface contamination on the plants. The major effect of traffic was limited to the surface soil and to a narrow zone within 100 feet of the highway. Plants grown in the field contained the most lead in the aerial portion and those grown in the greenhouse had the most lead in the roots. These studies indicate plants may obtain lead through both leaves and roots with little translocation within the plant. The fruiting and flowering parts of plants contained the smallest amounts of lead and showed little effect of changes in amounts of lead supplied. 19 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.},
doi = {10.1021/es60038a009},
journal = {Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 4:3,
place = {United States},
year = {1970},
month = {3}
}