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Title: System analysis, design, and proof-of-concept experiment of a total energy system. Final report, May 15, 1976--June 13, 1977

Abstract

Philips Laboratories investigated the application of Stirling-cycle prime movers to total-energy power generation systems. Electrical, heating, and cooling demand profiles for a typical residential complex, hospital, and office building were studied, and alternative Stirling total-energy systems were conceptualized for each site. These were analyzed in detail and contrasted with purchased-power systems for these sites to determine fuel-energy savings and investment attractiveness. The residential complex and hospital would be excellent candidates for total energy systems, and prime movers in the 1000-kW output range would be required. Stirling engines with so large an output have not been built to date, although there would be no fundamental technical barrier to prevent this. However, careful consideration must be given to the following technological decision areas before arriving at a final design, if its potential is to be realized: engine configuration, hot-side heat exchange interface, engine control system, internal gas seals, and advanced coal combustion technology. The principle advantage of a Stirling prime mover in this application, in view of national concern over present and future dependence on oil, is that it could utilize low-grade liquid fuels and coal.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Philips Labs., Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
5014397
Report Number(s):
COO-2947-3
DOE Contract Number:  
EY-76-C-02-2947
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; HOSPITALS; TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEMS; OFFICE BUILDINGS; RESIDENTIAL SECTOR; STIRLING CYCLE; COAL; COMBUSTION; DESIGN; EQUIPMENT; EVALUATION; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; FUEL OILS; POWER GENERATION; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; BUILDINGS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; MEDICAL CENTERS; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDATION; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; THERMODYNAMIC CYCLES; 290800* - Energy Planning & Policy- Heat Utilization- (1980-); 320101 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Residential Buildings- (-1987); 320104 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Commercial & Industrial Buildings- (-1987); 320102 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Office Buildings- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Lehrfeld, D. System analysis, design, and proof-of-concept experiment of a total energy system. Final report, May 15, 1976--June 13, 1977. United States: N. p., 1977. Web. doi:10.2172/5014397.
Lehrfeld, D. System analysis, design, and proof-of-concept experiment of a total energy system. Final report, May 15, 1976--June 13, 1977. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/5014397
Lehrfeld, D. 1977. "System analysis, design, and proof-of-concept experiment of a total energy system. Final report, May 15, 1976--June 13, 1977". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/5014397. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/5014397.
@article{osti_5014397,
title = {System analysis, design, and proof-of-concept experiment of a total energy system. Final report, May 15, 1976--June 13, 1977},
author = {Lehrfeld, D.},
abstractNote = {Philips Laboratories investigated the application of Stirling-cycle prime movers to total-energy power generation systems. Electrical, heating, and cooling demand profiles for a typical residential complex, hospital, and office building were studied, and alternative Stirling total-energy systems were conceptualized for each site. These were analyzed in detail and contrasted with purchased-power systems for these sites to determine fuel-energy savings and investment attractiveness. The residential complex and hospital would be excellent candidates for total energy systems, and prime movers in the 1000-kW output range would be required. Stirling engines with so large an output have not been built to date, although there would be no fundamental technical barrier to prevent this. However, careful consideration must be given to the following technological decision areas before arriving at a final design, if its potential is to be realized: engine configuration, hot-side heat exchange interface, engine control system, internal gas seals, and advanced coal combustion technology. The principle advantage of a Stirling prime mover in this application, in view of national concern over present and future dependence on oil, is that it could utilize low-grade liquid fuels and coal.},
doi = {10.2172/5014397},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/5014397}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1977},
month = {8}
}