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Title: Mining the potential interrelationships between human health and ecological risk assessments of metal-contaminated sites

Abstract

Conservative approaches to human health or ecological risk assessment often result in evaluations that indicate a risk at metal concentrations near or below background levels. This presents a complex dilemma to regulators, responsible parties, and the public: How can risk be more realistically estimated so that the public is not unnecessarily alarmed into thinking normal exposures pose abnormal risk, and site remediation can be responsible yet cost-effective? One answer is using-ecological and human health studies together to improve the quality of both types of assessments. Mammalian herbivores and roving children are good spatial and temporal integrators of exposure; biomarkers or Monte Carlo-based models of exposure to herbivores can support realistic estimates of exposure to children. Reduced bioavailability of metals in soils at mining sites is well recognized for many metals and is amenable to study in ecological species; such studies reduce the overestimate of risk to humans through direct contact or exposure via the food chain. Recent and current human health studies of lead and arsenic bioavailability also support ecological assessments. Mixtures of metals pose special challenges because of the potential for antagonistic, additive, or synergistic effects with respect to bioavailability, absorption, distribution, excretion, toxic effects and nutritional or physiologicalmore » essentiality. Combining results from pharmacokinetic, mechanistic, and environmental studies of mixtures enhances the predictive abilities of risk assessments.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
49544
Report Number(s):
CONF-9410273-
TRN: IM9523%%367
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 15. annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), Denver, CO (United States), 30 Oct - 3 Nov 1994; Other Information: PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 15th annual meeting: Abstract book. Ecological risk: Science, policy, law, and perception; PB: 286 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; LEAD; TOXICITY; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ARSENIC; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; REMEDIAL ACTION; DECISION MAKING

Citation Formats

Appling, J W. Mining the potential interrelationships between human health and ecological risk assessments of metal-contaminated sites. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Appling, J W. Mining the potential interrelationships between human health and ecological risk assessments of metal-contaminated sites. United States.
Appling, J W. Sat . "Mining the potential interrelationships between human health and ecological risk assessments of metal-contaminated sites". United States.
@article{osti_49544,
title = {Mining the potential interrelationships between human health and ecological risk assessments of metal-contaminated sites},
author = {Appling, J W},
abstractNote = {Conservative approaches to human health or ecological risk assessment often result in evaluations that indicate a risk at metal concentrations near or below background levels. This presents a complex dilemma to regulators, responsible parties, and the public: How can risk be more realistically estimated so that the public is not unnecessarily alarmed into thinking normal exposures pose abnormal risk, and site remediation can be responsible yet cost-effective? One answer is using-ecological and human health studies together to improve the quality of both types of assessments. Mammalian herbivores and roving children are good spatial and temporal integrators of exposure; biomarkers or Monte Carlo-based models of exposure to herbivores can support realistic estimates of exposure to children. Reduced bioavailability of metals in soils at mining sites is well recognized for many metals and is amenable to study in ecological species; such studies reduce the overestimate of risk to humans through direct contact or exposure via the food chain. Recent and current human health studies of lead and arsenic bioavailability also support ecological assessments. Mixtures of metals pose special challenges because of the potential for antagonistic, additive, or synergistic effects with respect to bioavailability, absorption, distribution, excretion, toxic effects and nutritional or physiological essentiality. Combining results from pharmacokinetic, mechanistic, and environmental studies of mixtures enhances the predictive abilities of risk assessments.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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