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Title: Toxicity of zinc and copper to Brassica species: Implications for phytoremediation

Abstract

The toxicity of Zn and Cu in three species from the genus Brassica was examined to determine if these plants showed sufficient tolerance and metal accumulation to be used to phytoremediate a site contaminated with these two heavy metals. Hydroponically grown 12-d-old plants of Brassica juncea, B. rapa, and B. napus were grown for an additional 14 d in the presence of either elevated Zn (6.5 mg L{sup {minus}1}), Cu (0.32 mg L{sup {minus}1}), or Zn+Cu to quantify the toxic effects of these metals on several different growth parameters. With few exceptions, both root and shoot dry weight for all three species decreased significantly in the presence of heavy metals. Cu inhibited lateral root elongation in B. rapa, B. napus, and, to a lesser extent, B. juncea, while Zn tended to decrease only lateral root diameter. Both metals reduced shoot Fe and Mn concentrations in all three Brassica spp. to levels associated with Fe and Mn deficiencies. These deficiencies, however, did not correlate with observed patterns of leaf chlorosis. Nonetheless, heavy metal-induced inhibition of Fe and Mn accumulation may have been a significant factor in reducing plant growth. In terms of heavy metal removal, the Brassica spp, were more effectivemore » at removing Zn from the nutrient solution than Cu. The extent of Zn and Cu removal was reduced in the presence of both metals, as compared to the single heavy metal treatments. The implications of these results for phytoremediation are discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
494213
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Environmental Quality
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: May-Jun 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COPPER; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; REMOVAL; ZINC; BRASSICA; PLANT GROWTH; REMEDIAL ACTION; POLLUTANTS; CHLOROSIS; METALS; TOLERANCE; TOXICITY; US SUPERFUND

Citation Formats

Ebbs, S D, and Kochian, L V. Toxicity of zinc and copper to Brassica species: Implications for phytoremediation. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2134/jeq1997.00472425002600030026x.
Ebbs, S D, & Kochian, L V. Toxicity of zinc and copper to Brassica species: Implications for phytoremediation. United States. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq1997.00472425002600030026x
Ebbs, S D, and Kochian, L V. Thu . "Toxicity of zinc and copper to Brassica species: Implications for phytoremediation". United States. https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq1997.00472425002600030026x.
@article{osti_494213,
title = {Toxicity of zinc and copper to Brassica species: Implications for phytoremediation},
author = {Ebbs, S D and Kochian, L V},
abstractNote = {The toxicity of Zn and Cu in three species from the genus Brassica was examined to determine if these plants showed sufficient tolerance and metal accumulation to be used to phytoremediate a site contaminated with these two heavy metals. Hydroponically grown 12-d-old plants of Brassica juncea, B. rapa, and B. napus were grown for an additional 14 d in the presence of either elevated Zn (6.5 mg L{sup {minus}1}), Cu (0.32 mg L{sup {minus}1}), or Zn+Cu to quantify the toxic effects of these metals on several different growth parameters. With few exceptions, both root and shoot dry weight for all three species decreased significantly in the presence of heavy metals. Cu inhibited lateral root elongation in B. rapa, B. napus, and, to a lesser extent, B. juncea, while Zn tended to decrease only lateral root diameter. Both metals reduced shoot Fe and Mn concentrations in all three Brassica spp. to levels associated with Fe and Mn deficiencies. These deficiencies, however, did not correlate with observed patterns of leaf chlorosis. Nonetheless, heavy metal-induced inhibition of Fe and Mn accumulation may have been a significant factor in reducing plant growth. In terms of heavy metal removal, the Brassica spp, were more effective at removing Zn from the nutrient solution than Cu. The extent of Zn and Cu removal was reduced in the presence of both metals, as compared to the single heavy metal treatments. The implications of these results for phytoremediation are discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.2134/jeq1997.00472425002600030026x},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/494213}, journal = {Journal of Environmental Quality},
number = 3,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {5}
}