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Title: Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product

Abstract

Objective was to follow the cognitive and creative processes demonstrated by student research participants as they integrated a developing knowledge of ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, into a personal and idiosyncratic visual, graphical, or multimedia product. The participants, all non-scientists, involved in this process, attended a series of design classes, sponsored by LLNL at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA. As a result of this study, we have become interested in the possibility of similar characteristics between scientists and artists. We have also become interested in the different processes that can be used to teach science to non-scientists, so that they are able to understand and portray scientific information.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
493344
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-126587; CONF-970391-1
ON: DE97052690
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual conference of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL (United States), 24-28 Mar 1997; Other Information: PBD: 24 Feb 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; EDUCATION; COMPUTER GRAPHICS; DESIGN; SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL; LEARNING; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LABORATORY

Citation Formats

Sesko, S.C., and Marchant, M. Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Sesko, S.C., & Marchant, M. Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product. United States.
Sesko, S.C., and Marchant, M. Mon . "Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/493344.
@article{osti_493344,
title = {Science/art - art/science: case studies of the development of a professional art product},
author = {Sesko, S.C. and Marchant, M.},
abstractNote = {Objective was to follow the cognitive and creative processes demonstrated by student research participants as they integrated a developing knowledge of ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, into a personal and idiosyncratic visual, graphical, or multimedia product. The participants, all non-scientists, involved in this process, attended a series of design classes, sponsored by LLNL at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA. As a result of this study, we have become interested in the possibility of similar characteristics between scientists and artists. We have also become interested in the different processes that can be used to teach science to non-scientists, so that they are able to understand and portray scientific information.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Mon Feb 24 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
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