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Title: Science into art: A study of the creative process

Abstract

Objective was to examine the creative process, demonstrated by 5 student participants in a class at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, from the germ of the creative idea through the final creative product. The students, drawn from classes sponsored by LLNL, were assigned the problem of representing ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, in a graphic, artistic, or multimedia product. As a result of this study, it was discovered that the process of creativity with these students was not linear in nature, nor did it strictly follow the traditional creativity 5-step schema of preparation, incubation, insight, evaluation, and elaboration. Of particular interest were several emergent themes of the creative process: spontaneous use of metaphor to describe the Laboratory; a general lack of interest in ``school`` science or mathematics by the American art students; a well developed sense of conscience; and finally, the symbolism inherent in the repeated use of a single artistic element. This use of the circle revealed a continuity of thinking and design perhaps related to the idealistic bias mentioned above.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Cosumnes River Coll., Folsom Lake Center, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
492012
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-126736; CONF-970391-2
ON: DE97052687
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Annual conference of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL (United States), 24-28 Mar 1997; Other Information: PBD: 14 Mar 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; DESIGN; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LABORATORY; ADOLESCENTS

Citation Formats

Marchant, M., and Sesko, S.C. Science into art: A study of the creative process. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Marchant, M., & Sesko, S.C. Science into art: A study of the creative process. United States.
Marchant, M., and Sesko, S.C. Fri . "Science into art: A study of the creative process". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/492012.
@article{osti_492012,
title = {Science into art: A study of the creative process},
author = {Marchant, M. and Sesko, S.C.},
abstractNote = {Objective was to examine the creative process, demonstrated by 5 student participants in a class at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, from the germ of the creative idea through the final creative product. The students, drawn from classes sponsored by LLNL, were assigned the problem of representing ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, in a graphic, artistic, or multimedia product. As a result of this study, it was discovered that the process of creativity with these students was not linear in nature, nor did it strictly follow the traditional creativity 5-step schema of preparation, incubation, insight, evaluation, and elaboration. Of particular interest were several emergent themes of the creative process: spontaneous use of metaphor to describe the Laboratory; a general lack of interest in ``school`` science or mathematics by the American art students; a well developed sense of conscience; and finally, the symbolism inherent in the repeated use of a single artistic element. This use of the circle revealed a continuity of thinking and design perhaps related to the idealistic bias mentioned above.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 14 00:00:00 EST 1997},
month = {Fri Mar 14 00:00:00 EST 1997}
}

Conference:
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