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Title: LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu

Abstract

On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
491860
Report Number(s):
CONF-9609263-1-Exec.Summ.
ON: DE97053148; TRN: 97:019090
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: LLNL workshop on TEM of PU, Livermore, CA (United States), 10 Sep 1996; Other Information: PBD: 10 Sep 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 40 CHEMISTRY; PLUTONIUM; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; MEETINGS; EXPERIMENT PLANNING

Citation Formats

King, W.E. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
King, W.E. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu. United States.
King, W.E. Tue . "LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/491860.
@article{osti_491860,
title = {LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu},
author = {King, W.E.},
abstractNote = {On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 10 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Tue Sep 10 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and its alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmospheremore » of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, high-pressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Facility, the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Triumph Accelerator in Canada.« less
  • Microstructural characterization of plutonium utilizing Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), has previously been shown to be difficult because of the extreme toxicity and high oxidation rate of plutonium metal. Recent developments in plutonium sample preparation have shown that TEM foils of both alpha and delta phases may be prepared without the use of inert atmospheric systems on complex preparation devices. Using standard electropolishing techniques, samples may be produced which yield important microstructural data on plutonium and plutonium alloys. 15 refs., 4 figs.
  • Abstract not provided.
  • In November 2008, the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA) co-hosted the International Workshop on Gamma Spectrometry Analysis Codes for U and Pu Isotopics at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This workshop was conducted in response to needs expressed by the international safeguards community to understand better the capabilities and limitations of the codes; to ensure these codes are sustained; and to ensure updates or revisions are performed in a controlled manner. The workshop was attended by approximately 100 participants. The participants included code developers, code suppliers, safeguards specialists, domesticmore » and international inspectors, process operators, regulators, and programme sponsors from various government agencies. The workshop provided a unique opportunity for code developers, commercial distributors and end users to interact in a hands-on laboratory environment to develop solutions for programmatic and technical issues associated with the various codes. The workshop also provided an international forum for discussing development of an internationally accepted standard test method. This paper discusses the organization of the workshop, its goals and objectives and feedback received from the participants. The paper also describes the significance of the working group's contribution to improving codes that are commonly used during inspections to verify that nuclear facilities are compliant with treaty obligations that ensure nuclear fuel cycle facilities are used for peaceful purposes.« less