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Title: An information system for the evaluation of hazardous waste sites in the real world or: What the heck is GIS, just give me a map!

Abstract

The evaluation of hazardous waste sites can often involve the management and analysis of large amounts of information. This information includes data not only from environmental sampling of organic compounds, but also from demographic analyses, health outcome evaluations, and community involvement activities. The management and use of this information can become a logistical nightmare, particularly for those without the time and patience to learn new, complex systems. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has designed an information management system with these users in mind. Site information is stored in a data server (SYBASE relational database), and is accessed by several different applications. The system uses a graphical user interface to facilitate and integrate the use of statistical and GIS software. These applications, along with the interface, provide the capability to organize, visualize, and analyze the information. This system is designed to provide the types of analyses which environmental assessors usually need, yet also to remain flexible enough to tailor the evaluation for each site.

Authors:
; ;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  2. Orkand Corp., Atlanta, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
488846
Report Number(s):
CONF-9610152-
TRN: IM9728%%37
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 17. Superfund hazardous waste conference, Washington, DC (United States), 15-17 Oct 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Hazwaste world, Superfund XVII: Conference proceedings; PB: 879 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; SANITARY LANDFILLS; REMEDIAL ACTION; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; DATA ANALYSIS; DATA BASE MANAGEMENT; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Abouelnasr, D.M., Parker, R., Perry, L.M., Hewitt, B., Bates, J., and Aiken, G. An information system for the evaluation of hazardous waste sites in the real world or: What the heck is GIS, just give me a map!. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Abouelnasr, D.M., Parker, R., Perry, L.M., Hewitt, B., Bates, J., & Aiken, G. An information system for the evaluation of hazardous waste sites in the real world or: What the heck is GIS, just give me a map!. United States.
Abouelnasr, D.M., Parker, R., Perry, L.M., Hewitt, B., Bates, J., and Aiken, G. Tue . "An information system for the evaluation of hazardous waste sites in the real world or: What the heck is GIS, just give me a map!". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_488846,
title = {An information system for the evaluation of hazardous waste sites in the real world or: What the heck is GIS, just give me a map!},
author = {Abouelnasr, D.M. and Parker, R. and Perry, L.M. and Hewitt, B. and Bates, J. and Aiken, G.},
abstractNote = {The evaluation of hazardous waste sites can often involve the management and analysis of large amounts of information. This information includes data not only from environmental sampling of organic compounds, but also from demographic analyses, health outcome evaluations, and community involvement activities. The management and use of this information can become a logistical nightmare, particularly for those without the time and patience to learn new, complex systems. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has designed an information management system with these users in mind. Site information is stored in a data server (SYBASE relational database), and is accessed by several different applications. The system uses a graphical user interface to facilitate and integrate the use of statistical and GIS software. These applications, along with the interface, provide the capability to organize, visualize, and analyze the information. This system is designed to provide the types of analyses which environmental assessors usually need, yet also to remain flexible enough to tailor the evaluation for each site.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
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