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Title: Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents

Abstract

While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
486362
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chemical Week; Journal Volume: 155; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: PBD: 5 Oct 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; POLLUTION ABATEMENT; SOLVENTS; US EPA; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; CLEAN AIR ACTS; VOLATILE MATTER; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

Citation Formats

Lucas, A. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Lucas, A. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents. United States.
Lucas, A. 1994. "Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_486362,
title = {Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents},
author = {Lucas, A.},
abstractNote = {While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.},
doi = {},
journal = {Chemical Week},
number = 12,
volume = 155,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month =
}
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