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Title: A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes

Abstract

Photoluminescence measurements have been made on a set of epitaxially grown strained GaAs photocathode structures. The photocathodes are designed to exhibit a strain-induced enhancement of the electron spin polarization obtainable by optical pumping with circularly polarized radiation of near band gap energy. For the case of non-strained GaAs, the degree of spin polarization is limited to 50% by crystal symmetry. Under an appropriate uniaxial compression or tension, however, the valence band structure near the gap minimum is modified such that a spin polarization of 100% is theoretically possible. A total of nine samples with biaxial compressive strains ranging from zero to {approximately}0.8% are studied. X-ray diffraction analysis, utilizing Bragg reflections, is used to determine the crystal lattice structure of the samples. Luminescence spectra and luminescence circular polarization data are obtained at room temperature, {approx}78 K and {approx}12 K. The degree of luminescence circular polarization is used as a relative measure of the photo-excited electron spin polarization. The room temperature luminescence circular polarization data is compared with the measured electron spin polarization when the samples are used as electron photo-emitters with a negative electron affinity surface preparation. The luminescence data is also analyzed in conjunction with the crystal structure data withmore » the goal of understanding the strain dependent valence band structure, optical pumping characteristics and spin depolarization mechanisms of the photocathode structures. A simple model is used to describe the luminescence data, obtained for the set of samples. Within the assumptions of the model, the deformation potentials a, b and d for GaAs are determined. The measured values are a = -10.16{+-}.21 eV, b = -2.00{+-}.05 eV and d = -4.87{+-}.29 eV. Good agreement with published values of the deformation potentials provides support for the model used to describe the data.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
486023
Report Number(s):
SLAC-R-488; WISC-EX-96-346
ON: DE97006545; TRN: 97:011386
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00515; AC02-76ER00881
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jul 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; GALLIUM ARSENIDES; PHOTOLUMINESCENCE; PHOTOCATHODES; ELECTRONS; SPIN; POLARIZATION; ELECTRON SOURCES

Citation Formats

Mair, R.A. A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/486023.
Mair, R.A. A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes. United States. doi:10.2172/486023.
Mair, R.A. 1996. "A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes". United States. doi:10.2172/486023. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/486023.
@article{osti_486023,
title = {A polarized photoluminescence study of strained layer GaAs photocathodes},
author = {Mair, R.A.},
abstractNote = {Photoluminescence measurements have been made on a set of epitaxially grown strained GaAs photocathode structures. The photocathodes are designed to exhibit a strain-induced enhancement of the electron spin polarization obtainable by optical pumping with circularly polarized radiation of near band gap energy. For the case of non-strained GaAs, the degree of spin polarization is limited to 50% by crystal symmetry. Under an appropriate uniaxial compression or tension, however, the valence band structure near the gap minimum is modified such that a spin polarization of 100% is theoretically possible. A total of nine samples with biaxial compressive strains ranging from zero to {approximately}0.8% are studied. X-ray diffraction analysis, utilizing Bragg reflections, is used to determine the crystal lattice structure of the samples. Luminescence spectra and luminescence circular polarization data are obtained at room temperature, {approx}78 K and {approx}12 K. The degree of luminescence circular polarization is used as a relative measure of the photo-excited electron spin polarization. The room temperature luminescence circular polarization data is compared with the measured electron spin polarization when the samples are used as electron photo-emitters with a negative electron affinity surface preparation. The luminescence data is also analyzed in conjunction with the crystal structure data with the goal of understanding the strain dependent valence band structure, optical pumping characteristics and spin depolarization mechanisms of the photocathode structures. A simple model is used to describe the luminescence data, obtained for the set of samples. Within the assumptions of the model, the deformation potentials a, b and d for GaAs are determined. The measured values are a = -10.16{+-}.21 eV, b = -2.00{+-}.05 eV and d = -4.87{+-}.29 eV. Good agreement with published values of the deformation potentials provides support for the model used to describe the data.},
doi = {10.2172/486023},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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  • Spin-polarized electron photoemission has been studied for GaAs/GaAs{sub 1-x}P{sub x} strained superlattice cathodes grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The superlattice structural parameters are systematically varied to optimize the photoemission characteristics. The heavy-hole and light-hole transitions are reproducibly observed in quantum efficiency spectra, enabling direct measurement of the band energies and the energy splitting. Electron-spin polarization as high as 86% with over 1% quantum efficiency has been observed.
  • GaAs-GaAsP and InGaAs-AlGaAs strained-layer superlattice photocathodes are presented as emission sources for highly polarized electron beams. The GaAs-GaAsP cathode achieved a maximum polarization of 92({+-}6)% with a quantum efficiency of 0.5%, while the InGaAs-AlGaAs cathode provides a higher quantum efficiency (0.7%) but a lower polarization [77({+-}5)%]. Criteria for achieving high polarization using superlattice photocathodes are discussed based on experimental spin-resolved quantum efficiency spectra.
  • Spin-polarized electron photoemission has been studied for GaAs/GaAs{sub 1-x}P{sub x} strained superlattice cathodes grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The superlattice structural parameters are systematically varied to optimize the photoemission characteristics. The heavy-hole and light-hole transitions are reproducibly observed in quantum efficiency spectra, enabling direct measurement of the band energies and the energy splitting. Electron-spin polarization as high as 86% with over 1% quantum efficiency has been observed.
  • This thesis presents studies on the polarization and charge limit behavior of electron beams produced by strained GaAs photocathodes. These photocathodes are the source of high-intensity, high-polarization electron beams used for a variety of high-energy physics experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Recent developments on P-type, biaxially-strained GaAs photocathodes have produced longitudinal polarization in excess of 80% while yielding beam intensities of {approximately} 2.5 A/cm{sup 2} at an operating voltage of 120 kV. The SLAC Gun Test Laboratory, which has a replica of the SLAC injector, was upgraded with a Mott polarimeter to study the polarization properties of photocathodesmore » operating in a high-voltage DC gun. Both the maximum beam polarization and the maximum charge obtainable from these photocathodes have shown a strong dependence on the wavelength of illumination, on the doping concentration, and on the negative electron affinity levels. The experiments performed for this thesis included studying the effects of temperature, cesiation, quantum efficiency, and laser intensity on the polarization of high-intensity beams. It was found that, although low temperatures have been shown to reduce the spin relaxation rate in bulk semiconductors, they don`t have a large impact on the polarization of thin photocathodes. It seems that the short active region in thin photocathodes does not allow spin relaxation mechanisms enough time to cause depolarization. Previous observations that lower QE areas on the photocathode yield higher polarization beams were confirmed. In addition, high-intensity, small-area laser pulses were shown to produce lower polarization beams. Based on these results, together with some findings in the existing literature, a new proposal for a high-intensity, high-polarization photocathode is given. It is hoped that the results of this thesis will promote further investigation on the properties of GaAs photocathodes.« less
  • Polarized electrons have been essential for high-energy parity-violating experiments and measurements of the nucleon spin structure. The availability of a polarized electron beam was crucial to the success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) in achieving a precise measurement of the electroweak mixing angle, and polarized electron beams will be required for all future linear colliders. Polarized electrons are readily produced by GaAs photocathode sources. When a circularly polarized laser beam tuned to the bandgap minimum is directed to the negative-electron-affinity (NEA) surface of a GaAs crystal, longitudinally polarized electrons are emitted into vacuum. The electron polarization is easily reversedmore » by reversing the laser polarization. The important properties of these photocathodes for accelerator applications are: degree of polarization of the extracted beam; ability to extract sufficient charge to meet accelerator pulse-structure requirements; efficiency and stability of operation; and absence of any asymmetries in the beam properties (charge, position, energy, etc.) upon polarization reversal. The performance of GaAs photocathodes has improved significantly since they were first introduced in 1978 [1]. The theoretical maximum polarization of 50% for natural GaAs was first exceeded in 1991 using the lattice mismatch of a thin InGaAs layer epitaxially grown over a GaAs substrate to generate a strain in the former that broke the natural degeneracy between the heavy- and light-hole valence bands [2]. Polarizations as high as 78% were produced for the SLC from photocathodes based on a thin GaAs epilayer grown on GaAsP [3,4]. After 10 years of experience with many cathode samples at several laboratories [5], the maximum polarization using the GaAs/GaAsP single strained-layer cathode remained limited to 80%, while the quantum efficiency (QE) for a 100-nm epilayer is only 0.3% or less. Two factors were known to limit the polarization of these cathodes: (1) the limited band splitting; and (2) a relaxation of the strain in the epilayer since the 10-nm critical thickness for maintaining perfect strain is exceeded for a 1 % lattice-mismatch [6]. Strained superlattice structures, consisting of very thin quantum well layers alternating with lattice-mismatched barrier layers are excellent candidates for higher polarization. Due to the difference in the effective mass of the heavy- and light-holes, a superlattice exhibits a natural splitting of the valence band, which adds to the strain-induced splitting. In addition, each of the SL layers is thinner than the critical thickness. Polarized photoemission from strained InGaAs/GaAs [7], InGaAdAlGaAs [8], and GaAs/GaAsP [9,10] superlattice structures have been reported in the literature. For this Phase II program, SVT Associates worked with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and University of Wisconsin at Madison to create photocathodes with improved polarization by employing GaAs/GaAsP superlattices. These superlattices consist of alternating thin layers of GaAs and GaAsP. The thicknesses and alloy compositions are designed to create a strained GaAs photoemission layer. Under strain, the heavy-hole and light-hole valence bands in GaAs split, removing degeneracy and allowing high polarization, theoretically 100%. This final report discusses the efforts and results achieved, comparing the device performance of newly created superlattice photocathodes grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with the devices created by other fabrication technologies, and efforts to optimize and improve the device operation.« less