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Title: Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

Abstract

Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement will be reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture. In addition to irradiation hardening, neutrons from the fusion reaction will produce large amounts of helium in the steels used to construct fusion power plant components. Tests to simulate the fusion environment indicate that helium can also affect the toughness. Steels are being developed for fusion applications that have a low DBTT prior to irradiation and then show only a small shift after irradiation. A martensitic 9Cr-2WVTa (nominally Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C) steel had a much lower DBTT than the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb steel prior to neutron irradiation and showed a much smaller increase in DBTT after irradiation. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1more » tab.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
485950
Report Number(s):
CONF-970201-30
ON: DE97006317; TRN: 97:011376
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 126. annual meeting of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, Orlando, FL (United States), 9-13 Feb 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FERRITIC STEELS; IRRADIATION; DUCTILE-BRITTLE TRANSITIONS; MARTENSITIC STEELS; RADIATION HARDENING; HELIUM EMBRITTLEMENT; STEEL-CR9MONBV; TUNGSTEN ADDITIONS; TANTALUM ADDITIONS; VANADIUM ADDITIONS

Citation Formats

Klueh, R.L., and Alexander, D.J. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Klueh, R.L., & Alexander, D.J. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels. United States.
Klueh, R.L., and Alexander, D.J. Sun . "Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/485950.
@article{osti_485950,
title = {Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels},
author = {Klueh, R.L. and Alexander, D.J.},
abstractNote = {Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement will be reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture. In addition to irradiation hardening, neutrons from the fusion reaction will produce large amounts of helium in the steels used to construct fusion power plant components. Tests to simulate the fusion environment indicate that helium can also affect the toughness. Steels are being developed for fusion applications that have a low DBTT prior to irradiation and then show only a small shift after irradiation. A martensitic 9Cr-2WVTa (nominally Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C) steel had a much lower DBTT than the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb steel prior to neutron irradiation and showed a much smaller increase in DBTT after irradiation. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997},
month = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997}
}

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