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Title: Consider the DME alternative for diesel engines

Abstract

Engine tests demonstrate that dimethyl ether (DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) can provide an alternative approach toward efficient, ultra-clean and quiet compression ignition (CI) engines. From a combustion point of view, DME is an attractive alternative fuel for CI engines, primarily for commercial applications in urban areas, where ultra-low emissions will be required in the future. DME can resolve the classical diesel emission problem of smoke emissions, which are completely eliminated. With a properly developed DME injection and combustion system, NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to 40% of Euro II or U.S. 1998 limits, and can meet the future ULEV standards of California. Simultaneously, the combustion noise is reduced by as much as 15 dB(A) below diesel levels. In addition, the classical diesel advantages such as high thermal efficiency, compression ignition, engine robustness, etc., are retained.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
482550
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Fuel Technology amp Management; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Jul-Aug 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; DIESEL ENGINES; DIESEL FUELS; OPERATION; DME; PRODUCTION; COMBUSTION PROPERTIES; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

Citation Formats

Fleisch, T.H., and Meurer, P.C.. Consider the DME alternative for diesel engines. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Fleisch, T.H., & Meurer, P.C.. Consider the DME alternative for diesel engines. United States.
Fleisch, T.H., and Meurer, P.C.. 1996. "Consider the DME alternative for diesel engines". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_482550,
title = {Consider the DME alternative for diesel engines},
author = {Fleisch, T.H. and Meurer, P.C.},
abstractNote = {Engine tests demonstrate that dimethyl ether (DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) can provide an alternative approach toward efficient, ultra-clean and quiet compression ignition (CI) engines. From a combustion point of view, DME is an attractive alternative fuel for CI engines, primarily for commercial applications in urban areas, where ultra-low emissions will be required in the future. DME can resolve the classical diesel emission problem of smoke emissions, which are completely eliminated. With a properly developed DME injection and combustion system, NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced to 40% of Euro II or U.S. 1998 limits, and can meet the future ULEV standards of California. Simultaneously, the combustion noise is reduced by as much as 15 dB(A) below diesel levels. In addition, the classical diesel advantages such as high thermal efficiency, compression ignition, engine robustness, etc., are retained.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fuel Technology amp Management},
number = 4,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 7
}
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