skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes

Abstract

This report documents the ARCON96 computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation for potential use in control room habitability assessments. It includes a user`s guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, and a programmer`s guide to the code. The ARCON96 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more than five percent of the time. The concentrations are calculated for averaging periods ranging from one hour to 30 days in duration. ARCON96 is a revised version of ARCON95, which was developed for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Changes in the code permit users to simulate releases from area sources as well as point sources. The method of averaging concentrations for periods longer than 2 hours has also been changed. The change in averaging procedures increases relative concentrations for these averaging periods. In general, the increase in concentrations is less than a factor of two. The increase is greatest for relatively short averaging periods, for example 0 to 8 hours and diminishes asmore » the duration of the averaging period increases.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation; Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
481848
Report Number(s):
NUREG/CR-6331-Rev.1; PNNL-10521-Rev.1
ON: TI97006385; TRN: 97:011218
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: May 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CONTROL ROOMS; RADIATION PROTECTION; INDOOR AIR CONTAMINATION; A CODES; MANUALS; FISSION PRODUCT RELEASE; SAFETY ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Ramsdell, J.V. Jr., and Simonen, C.A. Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2172/481848.
Ramsdell, J.V. Jr., & Simonen, C.A. Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes. United States. doi:10.2172/481848.
Ramsdell, J.V. Jr., and Simonen, C.A. Thu . "Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes". United States. doi:10.2172/481848. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/481848.
@article{osti_481848,
title = {Atmospheric relative concentrations in building wakes},
author = {Ramsdell, J.V. Jr. and Simonen, C.A.},
abstractNote = {This report documents the ARCON96 computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation for potential use in control room habitability assessments. It includes a user`s guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, and a programmer`s guide to the code. The ARCON96 code uses hourly meteorological data and recently developed methods for estimating dispersion in the vicinity of buildings to calculate relative concentrations at control room air intakes that would be exceeded no more than five percent of the time. The concentrations are calculated for averaging periods ranging from one hour to 30 days in duration. ARCON96 is a revised version of ARCON95, which was developed for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Changes in the code permit users to simulate releases from area sources as well as point sources. The method of averaging concentrations for periods longer than 2 hours has also been changed. The change in averaging procedures increases relative concentrations for these averaging periods. In general, the increase in concentrations is less than a factor of two. The increase is greatest for relatively short averaging periods, for example 0 to 8 hours and diminishes as the duration of the averaging period increases.},
doi = {10.2172/481848},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997},
month = {Thu May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: