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Title: ELF magnetic field exposure system with feedback-controlled disturbance rejection

Abstract

Extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposure systems are usually subject to field disturbances induced by external sources. Here, a method for designing a feedback control system for canceling the effect of external ELF magnetic field disturbances on the magnetic field over the exposure area is presented. This method was used in the design of a feedback-controlled exposure system for an inverted microscope stage. The effectiveness of the proposed feedback control system for disturbance rejection was verified experimentally and by means of computer simulation.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
479385
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bioelectromagnetics; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; CONTROL SYSTEMS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; DESIGN; ANIMAL CELLS

Citation Formats

Wang, P.K.C. ELF magnetic field exposure system with feedback-controlled disturbance rejection. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:4<299::AID-BEM2>3.0.CO;2-Y.
Wang, P.K.C. ELF magnetic field exposure system with feedback-controlled disturbance rejection. United States. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:4<299::AID-BEM2>3.0.CO;2-Y.
Wang, P.K.C. Sun . "ELF magnetic field exposure system with feedback-controlled disturbance rejection". United States. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:4<299::AID-BEM2>3.0.CO;2-Y.
@article{osti_479385,
title = {ELF magnetic field exposure system with feedback-controlled disturbance rejection},
author = {Wang, P.K.C.},
abstractNote = {Extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposure systems are usually subject to field disturbances induced by external sources. Here, a method for designing a feedback control system for canceling the effect of external ELF magnetic field disturbances on the magnetic field over the exposure area is presented. This method was used in the design of a feedback-controlled exposure system for an inverted microscope stage. The effectiveness of the proposed feedback control system for disturbance rejection was verified experimentally and by means of computer simulation.},
doi = {10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:4<299::AID-BEM2>3.0.CO;2-Y},
journal = {Bioelectromagnetics},
number = 4,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997},
month = {Sun Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1997}
}
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