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Title: Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

Abstract

Potential for phytoremediation of an aged radiocesium-contaminated soil from Brookhaven National Laboratory was investigated in three phases: (1) hydroponic screening for plant species capable of accumulating elevated levels of cesium in shoots, (2) amending contaminated soil to enhance {sup 137}Cs bioavailability, and (3) phytoextracting radiocesium with plant roots and its removal in harvested shoots. The bioaccumulation ratio of Cs in shoots of hydroponically grown plants ranged between 38 and 165. From solution, dicot species accumulated 2- to 4-fold more cesium in shoots than grasses. The effect of several chemical compounds on {sup 137}Cs desorption from the contaminated soil was investigated. Ammonium salts were the most effective at desorbing Cs from contaminated soil, but only 25% of radiocesium could be desorbed. Although release of radiocesium from the soil was concentration-dependent, this effect appeared to level off above 0.2 M ammonium in solution. In a pot study, from the soil contaminated with 400 pCi g{sup -1} soil, the greatest amount of {sup 137}Cs, 140 pCi, was removed in shoots of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata). {sup 137}Cs accumulation in shoots was significantly increased by the addition of 40 NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} kg{sup -1} soil. Increasing NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} application from 40 tomore » 80 mmoles kg{sup -1} soil did not further increase radiocesium phytoextraction. The ability to accumulate radiocesium from soil in shoots was significantly different among species tested. This ability increased in order: reed Canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) < Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) < tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) < cabbage.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Agricultural Research Service, Ithaca, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
479075
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/95701-T7
ON: DE97052313; TRN: 97:003579
DOE Contract Number:  
AI22-95PC95701
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: [1997]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; REMEDIAL ACTION; CESIUM 137; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; PROGRESS REPORT; BRASSICA; PHASEOLUS; SALTS; ROOT ABSORPTION; BNL; ADDITIVES; AMMONIUM NITRATES

Citation Formats

Kochian, L. Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2172/479075.
Kochian, L. Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996. United States. doi:10.2172/479075.
Kochian, L. Thu . "Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996". United States. doi:10.2172/479075. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/479075.
@article{osti_479075,
title = {Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996},
author = {Kochian, L},
abstractNote = {Potential for phytoremediation of an aged radiocesium-contaminated soil from Brookhaven National Laboratory was investigated in three phases: (1) hydroponic screening for plant species capable of accumulating elevated levels of cesium in shoots, (2) amending contaminated soil to enhance {sup 137}Cs bioavailability, and (3) phytoextracting radiocesium with plant roots and its removal in harvested shoots. The bioaccumulation ratio of Cs in shoots of hydroponically grown plants ranged between 38 and 165. From solution, dicot species accumulated 2- to 4-fold more cesium in shoots than grasses. The effect of several chemical compounds on {sup 137}Cs desorption from the contaminated soil was investigated. Ammonium salts were the most effective at desorbing Cs from contaminated soil, but only 25% of radiocesium could be desorbed. Although release of radiocesium from the soil was concentration-dependent, this effect appeared to level off above 0.2 M ammonium in solution. In a pot study, from the soil contaminated with 400 pCi g{sup -1} soil, the greatest amount of {sup 137}Cs, 140 pCi, was removed in shoots of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata). {sup 137}Cs accumulation in shoots was significantly increased by the addition of 40 NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} kg{sup -1} soil. Increasing NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} application from 40 to 80 mmoles kg{sup -1} soil did not further increase radiocesium phytoextraction. The ability to accumulate radiocesium from soil in shoots was significantly different among species tested. This ability increased in order: reed Canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) < Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) < tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) < cabbage.},
doi = {10.2172/479075},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {5}
}