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Title: Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium

Abstract

In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
477269
Report Number(s):
CONF-950483-
ISBN 1-57477-011-X; TRN: IM9724%%146
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 3. international in situ and on-site bioreclamation symposium, San Diego, CA (United States), 24-27 Apr 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Bioremediation of inorganics; Hinchee, R.E.; Means, J.L. [eds.] [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)]; Burris, D.R. [ed.]; PB: 183 p.; Bioremediation, Volume 3(10)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BIODEGRADATION; CYANIDES; ACETONITRILE; REMEDIAL ACTION; ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS; BIOREACTORS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Nagle, N.J., Rivard, C.J., Mohagheghi, A., and Philippidis, G.. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Nagle, N.J., Rivard, C.J., Mohagheghi, A., & Philippidis, G.. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium. United States.
Nagle, N.J., Rivard, C.J., Mohagheghi, A., and Philippidis, G.. Sun . "Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_477269,
title = {Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium},
author = {Nagle, N.J. and Rivard, C.J. and Mohagheghi, A. and Philippidis, G.},
abstractNote = {In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

Conference:
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  • Operational problems were encountered in the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and municipal sewage sludge in a 10.7-m-diam. digester. Use on increased mixing power would probably improve the operability of the system, but at the expense of increased energy costs.
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