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Title: Effect of low glacial atmospheric CO{sub 2} on tropical African montane vegetation

Abstract

Estimates of glacial-interglacial climate change in tropical Africa have varied widely. Results from a process-based vegetation model show how montane vegetation in East Africa shifts with changes in both carbon dioxide concentration and climate. For the last glacial maximum, the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration alone could explain the observed replacement of tropical montane forest by a scrub biome. This result implies that estimates of the last glacial maximum tropical cooling based on tree-line shifts must be revised. 30 refs., 2 figs.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Lund Univ. (Sweden)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
476674
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Science; Journal Volume: 276; Journal Issue: 5313; Other Information: PBD: 2 May 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CARBON DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; TROPICAL REGIONS; MOUNTAINS; PALEOCLIMATOLOGY

Citation Formats

Jolly, D., and Haxeltine, A. Effect of low glacial atmospheric CO{sub 2} on tropical African montane vegetation. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1126/science.276.5313.786.
Jolly, D., & Haxeltine, A. Effect of low glacial atmospheric CO{sub 2} on tropical African montane vegetation. United States. doi:10.1126/science.276.5313.786.
Jolly, D., and Haxeltine, A. 1997. "Effect of low glacial atmospheric CO{sub 2} on tropical African montane vegetation". United States. doi:10.1126/science.276.5313.786.
@article{osti_476674,
title = {Effect of low glacial atmospheric CO{sub 2} on tropical African montane vegetation},
author = {Jolly, D. and Haxeltine, A.},
abstractNote = {Estimates of glacial-interglacial climate change in tropical Africa have varied widely. Results from a process-based vegetation model show how montane vegetation in East Africa shifts with changes in both carbon dioxide concentration and climate. For the last glacial maximum, the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration alone could explain the observed replacement of tropical montane forest by a scrub biome. This result implies that estimates of the last glacial maximum tropical cooling based on tree-line shifts must be revised. 30 refs., 2 figs.},
doi = {10.1126/science.276.5313.786},
journal = {Science},
number = 5313,
volume = 276,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month = 5
}
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