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Title: Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup: Quarterly technical report No. 16, January 1996--March 1996

Abstract

The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (BFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). The major cost item in existing technology is capital investment. Therefore, our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. For example,more » we will extract the SO{sub 2} from the aqueous scrubbing liquor into an oligomer of dimethylaniline to avoid the problem of organic liquid losses in the regeneration of the organic liquid. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water soluble plithalocyanine compounds invented by SRI and also of polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media described in the open literature. Our past work with the phthalocyanine compounds, used as sensors for NO and NO{sub 2} in flue gases, shows that these compounds bind NO and NO{sub 2} reversibly and with no interference from O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, or other components of flue gas.« less

Authors:
;  [1]; ; ;  [2]
  1. SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  2. New Jersey Inst. of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
475609
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/91344-T18
ON: DE97052008; TRN: 97:003224
DOE Contract Number:
AC22-92PC91344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jun 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; FLUE GAS; SCRUBBING; SULFUR DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; NITROGEN OXIDES; FIBERS; CONFIGURATION; PROGRESS REPORT; COAL; DESORPTION; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COMBINED SOXNOX PROCESSES; PHTHALOCYANINES; MASS TRANSFER

Citation Formats

Bhown, A.S., Bahman, A., Sirkar, K.K., Majumdar, S., and Bhaumick, D.. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup: Quarterly technical report No. 16, January 1996--March 1996. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/475609.
Bhown, A.S., Bahman, A., Sirkar, K.K., Majumdar, S., & Bhaumick, D.. Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup: Quarterly technical report No. 16, January 1996--March 1996. United States. doi:10.2172/475609.
Bhown, A.S., Bahman, A., Sirkar, K.K., Majumdar, S., and Bhaumick, D.. 1996. "Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup: Quarterly technical report No. 16, January 1996--March 1996". United States. doi:10.2172/475609. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/475609.
@article{osti_475609,
title = {Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup: Quarterly technical report No. 16, January 1996--March 1996},
author = {Bhown, A.S. and Bahman, A. and Sirkar, K.K. and Majumdar, S. and Bhaumick, D.},
abstractNote = {The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (BFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). The major cost item in existing technology is capital investment. Therefore, our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. For example, we will extract the SO{sub 2} from the aqueous scrubbing liquor into an oligomer of dimethylaniline to avoid the problem of organic liquid losses in the regeneration of the organic liquid. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water soluble plithalocyanine compounds invented by SRI and also of polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media described in the open literature. Our past work with the phthalocyanine compounds, used as sensors for NO and NO{sub 2} in flue gases, shows that these compounds bind NO and NO{sub 2} reversibly and with no interference from O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, or other components of flue gas.},
doi = {10.2172/475609},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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  • During the first quarter of 1994, we continued work on Tasks 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. We also began work on Task 7. In Task 2, we incorporated 4.5% O{sub 2} into our simulated flue gas stream during this quarter`s NO{sub x}-absorption experiments. We also ran experiments using Cobalt (II)-phthalocyanine as an absorbing agent We observed higher absorption capacities when using this solution with the simulated flue gas containing O{sub 2}. In Task 3, we synthesized a few EDTA polymer analogs. We also began scaled up synthesis of Co(II)-phthalocyanine for use in Task 5. In Task 4, we performedmore » experiments for measuring distribution coefficients (m{sub i}) Of SO{sub 2} between aqueous and organic phases. This was done using the liquor regenerating apparatus described in Task 6. In Task 5, we began working with Co(II)-phthalocyanine in the 301 fiber hollow fiber contactor. We also calculated mass transfer coefficients (K{sub olm}) for these runs, and we observed that the gas side resistance dominates mass transfer. In Task 6, in the liquor regeneration apparatus, we observed 90% recovery of SO{sub 2} by DMA from water used as the scrubbing solution. We also calculated the distribution of coefficients (m{sub i}). In Task 7, we established and began implementing a methodology for completing this task.« less
  • The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors, (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverizedmore » coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams).« less
  • In the fourth quarter of 1992, we continued work on Tasks 2, 3, and 4. In Task 2, we continued preparation of the reversible absorption apparatus for measuring SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} solubilities. We received and installed the gas cabinet necessary for safe handling of these gases and made several modifications to the reversible absorption apparatus aimed at reducing the time required for each measurement. We also began evaluating chromatography columns for their ability to separate SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. In Task 3, we synthesized three polymers of dimethylangline (DMA). The first, an oligomer of DMA,more » resulted in an insoluble (to most solvents) solid that is unsuitable for use as an absorbent. In order to produce a liquid material, we synthesized several DMA copolymers. A 50:50 (mole ratio) copolymer of N-phenylaziridine and propyleneimine also resulted in a solid; however, reducing the N-phenylaziridine to propyleneimine ratio to 30:70 produced a liquid at room temperature. Fourteen grams of the 30:70 copolymer were, prepared for absorption measurements. In Task 4, we performed three sets of BFC experiments. The objective of the first two sets was to determine the liquid phase mass transfer coefficient and the objective of the third set was to determine SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies. The Hoechst/Celanese (H/C) BFC modules were not received until late December, limiting us to prototype modules. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies were greater than 96% even with the prototype modules.« less
  • The objective of this project is to demonstrate the potential for application of the NOXSO Flue Gas Treatment (FGT) technology to coal-fired utility boilers in the 1990's. To accomplish this, the NOXSO team will design, construct, operate, and test a proof-of-concept-scale NOXSO test facility at Ohio Edison's Toronto Station. The goal of the proof-of-concept test is to obtain the engineering data required to prepare a cost effective design of a commercial scale NOXSO process module at an acceptable level of technical risk. A secondary goal of the test program is to optimize process performance, i.e., achieve 90% removal of SO{submore » 2} and NOX from the flue gas at the lowest possible cost, while maintaining the high level of system reliability dictated by the utility market. This quarter, work continued on experiment detailed design efforts.« less
  • The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (BFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverizedmore » coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). During the first quarter of 1995, the authors continued work on Task 8, and also began working on Task 9. In Task 8, they have presented the modified experimental arrangement for testing the efficacy of Co(II)-phthalocyanine solution for NO{sub x} absorption as well as desorption over extended periods of time. The key feature of this new experimental setup is to continuously circulate the warm Co(II)-phthalocyanine solution (using a computer) through the HFC in order to avoid precipitation within the fibers. Also, this arrangement allows one to automatically acquire process data. In Task 9, the authors carried out preliminary design calculations to determine the performance of a rectangular module that will be supplied by Setec. Also, they designed and constructed the apparatus for testing these modules.« less