skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3-D) geoscience volume modeling can be used to improve the efficiency of the environmental investigation and remediation process. At several unsaturated zone spill sites at two Superfund (CERCLA) sites (Military Installations) in California, all aspects of subsurface contamination have been characterized using an integrated computerized approach. With the aide of software such as LYNX GMS{trademark}, Wavefront`s Data Visualizer{trademark} and Gstools (public domain), the authors have created a central platform from which to map a contaminant plume, visualize the same plume three-dimensionally, and calculate volumes of contaminated soil or groundwater above important health risk thresholds. The developed methodology allows rapid data inspection for decisions such that the characterization process and remedial action design are optimized. By using the 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques, the technical staff are able to evaluate the completeness and spatial variability of the data and conduct 3-D geostatistical predictions of contaminant and lithologic distributions. The geometry of each plume is estimated using 3-D variography on raw analyte values and indicator thresholds for the kriged model. Three-dimensional lithologic interpretation is based on either {open_quote}linked{close_quote} parallel cross sections or on kriged grid estimations derived from borehole data coded with permeability indicator thresholds. Investigative borings, as well asmore » soil vapor extraction/injection wells, are sighted and excavation costs are estimated using these results. The principal advantages of the technique are the efficiency and rapidity with which meaningful results are obtained and the enhanced visualization capability which is a desirable medium to communicate with both the technical staff as well as nontechnical audiences.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)
  2. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., Sacramento, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
474026
Report Number(s):
CONF-960804-Vol.2
TRN: 97:002181-0027
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPECTRUM `96: international conference on nuclear and hazardous waste management, Seattle, WA (United States), 18-23 Aug 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the international topical meeting on nuclear and hazardous waste management (SPECTRM `96): Volume 2; PB: 875 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HYDROCARBONS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SPILLS; NONAQUEOUS SOLVENTS; REMEDIAL ACTION; TOPOLOGICAL MAPPING; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; MILITARY FACILITIES; FLOW VISUALIZATION

Citation Formats

Hedegaard, R.F., Ho, J., and Eisert, J. Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Hedegaard, R.F., Ho, J., & Eisert, J. Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques. United States.
Hedegaard, R.F., Ho, J., and Eisert, J. Tue . "Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_474026,
title = {Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques},
author = {Hedegaard, R.F. and Ho, J. and Eisert, J.},
abstractNote = {Three-dimensional (3-D) geoscience volume modeling can be used to improve the efficiency of the environmental investigation and remediation process. At several unsaturated zone spill sites at two Superfund (CERCLA) sites (Military Installations) in California, all aspects of subsurface contamination have been characterized using an integrated computerized approach. With the aide of software such as LYNX GMS{trademark}, Wavefront`s Data Visualizer{trademark} and Gstools (public domain), the authors have created a central platform from which to map a contaminant plume, visualize the same plume three-dimensionally, and calculate volumes of contaminated soil or groundwater above important health risk thresholds. The developed methodology allows rapid data inspection for decisions such that the characterization process and remedial action design are optimized. By using the 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques, the technical staff are able to evaluate the completeness and spatial variability of the data and conduct 3-D geostatistical predictions of contaminant and lithologic distributions. The geometry of each plume is estimated using 3-D variography on raw analyte values and indicator thresholds for the kriged model. Three-dimensional lithologic interpretation is based on either {open_quote}linked{close_quote} parallel cross sections or on kriged grid estimations derived from borehole data coded with permeability indicator thresholds. Investigative borings, as well as soil vapor extraction/injection wells, are sighted and excavation costs are estimated using these results. The principal advantages of the technique are the efficiency and rapidity with which meaningful results are obtained and the enhanced visualization capability which is a desirable medium to communicate with both the technical staff as well as nontechnical audiences.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • For an accurate prediction of the production profile of a hydrocarbon reservoir, an optimal assessment of the geological reservoir model is required. The reservoir architecture and lithostratigraphic properties of the model are the most important boundary conditions in the economic evaluation of the reservoir. In this paper, I will show how seismic data can be used to extract lithostratigraphic information to constrain the reservoir model. Two innovative seismic inversion schemes based on the application of artificial neural networks are presented to achieve this goal. Method 1 is a deterministic approach; [open quotes]back-propagation[close quotes] networks are trained by offering seismic responsesmore » at well location as input nodes and well results, e.g., reservoir porosity and/or net-to-gross ratio's, as output nodes. This method can be applied on existing fields with sufficient well control only. Method 2 is a stochastic approach that can be employed in areas with limited well control. Synthetic seismograms are created by stochastically varying the model input parameters such as layer thicknesses, densities, and velocities. The networks are trained by offering the filtered synthetic seismograms an input nodes and one (or more) of the underlying model parameters as the output nodes. In both methods, the trained networks are tested on independent data sets to obtain a measure for the accuracy of the obtained results. The trained and tested networks are subsequently applied to the real seismic data. The techniques discussed in this paper are to be implemented in an industrial quality software package by the [open quotes]Probe[close quotes] consortium.« less
  • Communication with stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and the public is an essential part of implementing different remediation and monitoring activities, and developing site closure strategies at contaminated sites. Modeling of contaminant plume evolution plays a critical role in estimating the benefit, cost, and risk of particular options. At the same time, effective visualization of monitoring data and modeling results are particularly important for conveying the significance of the results and observations. In this paper, we present the results of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project, including the discussion of the capabilities of newly developed ASCEM software package, alongmore » with its application to the F-Area Seepage Basins located in the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). ASCEM software includes state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating complex flow and reactive transport, as well as various toolsets such as a graphical user interface (GUI), visualization, data management, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation. Using this software, we have developed an advanced visualization of tritium plume migration coupled with a data management system, and simulated a three-dimensional model of flow and plume evolution on a high-performance computing platform. We evaluated the effect of engineered flow barriers on a nonreactive tritium plume, through advanced plume visualization and modeling of tritium plume migration. In addition, we developed a geochemical reaction network to describe complex geochemical processes at the site, and evaluated the impact of coupled hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These results are expected to support SRS’s monitoring activities and operational decisions.« less
  • The T2VOC computer model for simulating the transport of organic chemical contaminants in non-isothermal multiphase systems has been coupled to the ITOUGH2 code which solves parameter optimization problems. This allows one to use linear programming and simulated annealing techniques to solve groundwater management problems, i.e. the optimization of operations for multiphase aquifer remediation. A cost function has to be defined, containing the actual and hypothetical expenses of a cleanup operation which depend - directly or indirectly - on the state variables calculated by T2VOC. Subsequently, the code iteratively determines a remediation strategy (e.g. pumping schedule) which minimizes, for instance, pumpingmore » and energy costs, the time for cleanup, and residual contamination. We discuss an illustrative sample problem to discuss potential applications of the code. The study shows that the techniques developed for estimating model parameters can be successfully applied to the solution of remediation management problems. The resulting optimum pumping scheme depends, however, on the formulation of the remediation goals and the relative weighting between individual terms of the cost function.« less
  • This report describes new advances in the computational modeling of ground water and seepage using the finite element method (FEM) in conjunction with tools and techniques typically used by the aerospace engineers. The unsolved environmental issues regarding our hazardous and toxic waste problems must be resolved, and significant resources must be placed on this effort. Some military bases are contaminated with hazardous waste that has entered the groundwater domain. A groundwater model that takes into account contaminant flow is therefore critical. First, an extension of the technique of generating an orthogonal structured grid (using the Cauchy-Riemann equations) to automatically generatemore » a flow net for two-dimensional (2-D) steady-state seepage problems is presented for various boundary conditions. Second, a complete implementation of a three-dimensional (3-D) seepage package is described where (1) grid generation is accomplished using the EAGLE program, (2) the seepage and groundwater analysis for either confined or unconfined steady-state flow, homogeneous or inhomogeneous media, and isotropic or anisotropic soil is accomplished with no restriction on the FE grid or requirement of an initial guess of the free surface for unconfined flow problems, and (3) scientific visualization is accomplished using the program FAST developed by NASA.« less
  • An initial soil characterization study was conducted to help identify possible remediation methods to remove plutonium from the Nevada Test Site and Tonapah Test Range surface soils. Results from soil samples collected across various isopleths at five sites indicate that the size-fraction distribution patterns of plutonium remain similar to findings from the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) (1970's). The plutonium remains in the upper 10--15 cm of soils, as indicated in previous studies. Distribution of fine particles downwind'' of ground zero at each site is suggested. Whether this pattern was established immediately after each explosion or this resulted from post-shotmore » wind movement of deposited material is unclear. Several possible soil treatment scenarios are presented. Removal of plutonium from certain size fractions of the soils would alleviate the sites of much of the plutonium burden. However, the nature of association of plutonium with soil components will determine which remediation methods will most likely succeed.« less