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Title: Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study

Abstract

To study the evolution of cytogenetic damage from past exposure to high concentrations of benzene and its health significance, chromosome aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes were reinvestigated after approximately 20 years in four subjects with past severe hemopathy and in seven controls studied in the late 1960s. Increased chromosome-type aberrations were still present up to 30 years after benzene toxicity, but blood counts were normal. The vital status at the end of 1993 was ascertained for 32 subjects with a history of benzene toxicity and for 31 controls studied for CA from 1965 to 1970, who differed significantly for CA rates. Of the 32 benzene-exposed subjects, 1 was lost to follow-up, 20 were still alive, and 11 had died at ages 36 to 83, between 1 and 20 years after the last CA study. Five deaths were from neoplasia (acute erythroleukemia, brain tumor, cancer of lung, paranasal cavity, esophagus). The deceased subjects had significantly higher rates of chromosome-type aberrations than those alive, and those who died of neoplasia had the highest rates of these aberrations in the last study before death or diagnosis of cancer. Out of the 31 controls, 12 had died from 4 to 23 years after the CAmore » study. Three deaths were from neoplasia (two lung cancer, one brain tumor). Even if this is a small sample, the results suggest a higher risk of cancer for the benzene-exposed cohort, who had persistently high CA rates in lymphocytes. 10 refs., 4 tabs.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Milan (Italy)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
472177
Report Number(s):
CONF-9506288-
Journal ID: EVHPAZ; ISSN 0091-6765; TRN: 97:001626-0029
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Health Perspectives; Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: Suppl.6; Conference: Benzene `95: international conference on benzene toxicity, carcinogenesis, and epidemiology, Piscataway, NJ (United States), 17-20 Jun 1995; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; BENZENE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; LYMPHOCYTES; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; TOXICITY; BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; EXHAUST GASES; AIR POLLUTION; PETROLEUM REFINERIES; CARCINOGENS

Citation Formats

Forni, A. Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2307/3433181.
Forni, A. Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study. United States. doi:10.2307/3433181.
Forni, A. 1996. "Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study". United States. doi:10.2307/3433181.
@article{osti_472177,
title = {Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: A follow-up study},
author = {Forni, A.},
abstractNote = {To study the evolution of cytogenetic damage from past exposure to high concentrations of benzene and its health significance, chromosome aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes were reinvestigated after approximately 20 years in four subjects with past severe hemopathy and in seven controls studied in the late 1960s. Increased chromosome-type aberrations were still present up to 30 years after benzene toxicity, but blood counts were normal. The vital status at the end of 1993 was ascertained for 32 subjects with a history of benzene toxicity and for 31 controls studied for CA from 1965 to 1970, who differed significantly for CA rates. Of the 32 benzene-exposed subjects, 1 was lost to follow-up, 20 were still alive, and 11 had died at ages 36 to 83, between 1 and 20 years after the last CA study. Five deaths were from neoplasia (acute erythroleukemia, brain tumor, cancer of lung, paranasal cavity, esophagus). The deceased subjects had significantly higher rates of chromosome-type aberrations than those alive, and those who died of neoplasia had the highest rates of these aberrations in the last study before death or diagnosis of cancer. Out of the 31 controls, 12 had died from 4 to 23 years after the CA study. Three deaths were from neoplasia (two lung cancer, one brain tumor). Even if this is a small sample, the results suggest a higher risk of cancer for the benzene-exposed cohort, who had persistently high CA rates in lymphocytes. 10 refs., 4 tabs.},
doi = {10.2307/3433181},
journal = {Environmental Health Perspectives},
number = Suppl.6,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}
  • The frequency of x-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in G0 human lymphocytes was greatly increased when cells were incubated with cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) after irradiation. The frequency of dicentrics increased with increasing ara-C incubation times (one, two, and three hours). Lymphocytes from Down syndrome individuals were more sensitive to aberration induction by x-rays in G0, and the increase in dicentric frequency with ara-C incubation was much more rapid than with normal cells. When G2 normal lymphocytes were x-irradiated and incubated for two or three hours with ara-C until fixation, there was a large increase in deletion frequency compared to cells x-irradiated andmore » incubated in the absence of ara-C. However, no exchanges were observed in the presence of ara-C, compared to 0.29 per cell as when x-rays alone were given. These results form the basis for a discussion of the mechanism of aberration induction by x-rays. Experiments with two chemicals, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and methyl methanesulfonate, show that chromosome-type aberrations can be induced in G1 treated lymphocytes incubated with ara-C. However, these chemicals, in the absence of ara-C incubation, induced no aberrations in G1 at the concentrations used. The mechanism of aberration induction is discussed, particularly in terms of whether or not chemicals can be defined as S-phase dependent.« less
  • The frequency of x-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in G/sub 0/ human lymphocytes was greatly increased when cells were incubated with cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) after irradiation. The frequency of dicentrics increased with increasing ara-C incubation times (one, two, and three hours). Lymphocytes from Down syndrome individuals were more sensitive to aberration induction by x-rays in G/sub 0/, and the increase in dicentric frequency with ara-C incubation was much more rapid than with normal cells. When G/sub 2/ normal lymphocytes were x-irradiated and incubated for two or three hours with ara-C until fixation, there was a large increase in depletion frequency compared tomore » cells x-irradiated and incubated in the absence of ara-C. However, no exchanges were observed in the presence of ara-C, compared to 0.29 per cell as when x-rays alone were given. These results form the basis for a discussion of the mechanism of aberration induction by x-rays. Experiments with two chemicals, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and methyl methanesulfonate, show that chromosome-type aberrations can be induced in G/sub 1/ treated lymphocytes incubated with ara-C. However, these chemicals in the absence of ara-C incubation, induced no aberrations in G/sub 1/ at the concentrations used. The mechanism of aberration induction is discussed, particularly in terms of whether or not chemicals can be defined as S-phase dependent.« less