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Title: Compact environmental spectroscopy using advanced semiconductor light-emitting diodes and lasers

Abstract

This report summarizes research completed under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development program funded for part of FY94, FY95 and FY96. The main goals were (1) to develop novel, compound-semiconductor based optical sources to enable field-based detection of environmentally important chemical species using miniaturized, low-power, rugged, moderate cost spectroscopic equipment, and (2) to demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy to quantitatively measure contaminants. Potential applications would include monitoring process and effluent streams for volatile organic compound detection and sensing head-space gasses in storage vessels for waste management. Sensing is based on absorption in the 1.3-1.9 {mu}m band from overtones of the C-H, N-H and O-H stretch resonances. We describe work in developing novel broadband light-emitting diodes emitting over the entire 1.4-1.9 {mu}m wavelength range, first using InGaAs quantum wells, and second using a novel technique for growing digital-alloy materials in the InAlGaAs material system. Next we demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy for quantitatively determining contamination of soil by motor oil. Finally we discuss the separability of different classes of organic compounds using near-infrared spectroscopic techniques.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
469149
Report Number(s):
SAND-97-0369
ON: DE97005907; TRN: 97:002968
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Apr 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; LIGHT EMITTING DIODES; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; DESIGN; SEMICONDUCTOR LASERS; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; INFRARED SPECTRA; GALLIUM ARSENIDES

Citation Formats

Fritz, I J, Klem, J F, and Hafich, M J. Compact environmental spectroscopy using advanced semiconductor light-emitting diodes and lasers. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.2172/469149.
Fritz, I J, Klem, J F, & Hafich, M J. Compact environmental spectroscopy using advanced semiconductor light-emitting diodes and lasers. United States. doi:10.2172/469149.
Fritz, I J, Klem, J F, and Hafich, M J. Tue . "Compact environmental spectroscopy using advanced semiconductor light-emitting diodes and lasers". United States. doi:10.2172/469149. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/469149.
@article{osti_469149,
title = {Compact environmental spectroscopy using advanced semiconductor light-emitting diodes and lasers},
author = {Fritz, I J and Klem, J F and Hafich, M J},
abstractNote = {This report summarizes research completed under a Laboratory Directed Research and Development program funded for part of FY94, FY95 and FY96. The main goals were (1) to develop novel, compound-semiconductor based optical sources to enable field-based detection of environmentally important chemical species using miniaturized, low-power, rugged, moderate cost spectroscopic equipment, and (2) to demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy to quantitatively measure contaminants. Potential applications would include monitoring process and effluent streams for volatile organic compound detection and sensing head-space gasses in storage vessels for waste management. Sensing is based on absorption in the 1.3-1.9 {mu}m band from overtones of the C-H, N-H and O-H stretch resonances. We describe work in developing novel broadband light-emitting diodes emitting over the entire 1.4-1.9 {mu}m wavelength range, first using InGaAs quantum wells, and second using a novel technique for growing digital-alloy materials in the InAlGaAs material system. Next we demonstrate the utility of near-infrared spectroscopy for quantitatively determining contamination of soil by motor oil. Finally we discuss the separability of different classes of organic compounds using near-infrared spectroscopic techniques.},
doi = {10.2172/469149},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {4}
}