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Title: Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment

Abstract

Air sparging may have the potential to improve upon conventional groundwater treatment technologies. However, judging from studies published to date and theoretical analyses, it is possible that air sparging may have a limited effect on aquifer contamination. The basic mechanisms controlling air sparging are not well understood, and current monitoring practice does not appear adequate to quantitatively evaluate the process. During this study, the effective zone of influence, defined as the areas in which air channels form, was studied as a function of flowrate and depth of injection points. This was accomplished by conducting the air sparging test in an area with shallow standing water. Air sparging points were installed at various depths, and the zone of influence was determined visually.

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Battelle Columbus, OH (United States)
  2. Air Force, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States). Environics Directorate
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
467740
Report Number(s):
CONF-950483-
ISBN 1-57477-003-9; TRN: IM9721%%168
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 3. international in situ and on-site bioreclamation symposium, San Diego, CA (United States), 24-27 Apr 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of In situ aeration: Air sparging, bioventing, and related remediation process; Hinchee, R.E. [ed.] [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)]; Miller, R.N. [ed.] [Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, Brooks AFB, TX (United States)]; Johnson, P.C. [ed.] [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)]; PB: 630 p.; Bioremediation, Volume 3(2)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BIODEGRADATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; GAS INJECTION; IN-SITU PROCESSING; FIELD TESTS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Leeson, A., Hinchee, R.E., Headington, G.L., and Vogel, C.M. Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Leeson, A., Hinchee, R.E., Headington, G.L., & Vogel, C.M. Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment. United States.
Leeson, A., Hinchee, R.E., Headington, G.L., and Vogel, C.M. 1995. "Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_467740,
title = {Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment},
author = {Leeson, A. and Hinchee, R.E. and Headington, G.L. and Vogel, C.M.},
abstractNote = {Air sparging may have the potential to improve upon conventional groundwater treatment technologies. However, judging from studies published to date and theoretical analyses, it is possible that air sparging may have a limited effect on aquifer contamination. The basic mechanisms controlling air sparging are not well understood, and current monitoring practice does not appear adequate to quantitatively evaluate the process. During this study, the effective zone of influence, defined as the areas in which air channels form, was studied as a function of flowrate and depth of injection points. This was accomplished by conducting the air sparging test in an area with shallow standing water. Air sparging points were installed at various depths, and the zone of influence was determined visually.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Conference:
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