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Title: Lessons learned in acquiring new regulations for shipping advanced electric vehicle batteries

Abstract

In 1990, the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the US Department of Energy established its ad hoc EV Battery Readiness Working Group to identify regulatory barriers to the commercialization of advanced EV battery technologies and facilitate the removal of these barriers. A Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) was formed to address the regulatory issues associated with the domestic and international shipment of these new battery technologies. The SSWG invites major industrial developers of advanced battery technologies to join as members and work closely with appropriate domestic and international regulatory authorities to develop suitable regulations and procedures for the safe transport of these new battery technologies. This paper describes the domestic and international regulatory processes for the transport of dangerous goods; reviews the status of shipping regulations for sodium-beta and lithium batteries; and delineates the lessons learned to date in this process. The sodium-beta battery family was the first category of advanced EV batteries to be addressed by the SSWG. It includes both sodium/sulfur and sodium/metal chloride batteries. Their efforts led to the establishment of a UN number (UN 3292) in the UN Recommendations, for cold cells and batteries, and establishment of a US Department of Transportation general exemption (DOT-E-10917) coveringmore » cold and hot batteries, as well as cold cells. The lessons learned for sodium-beta batteries, over the period of 1990--94, are now being applied to the development of regulations for shipping a new generation of lithium battery technologies (lithium-polymer and lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries).« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
  3. Winston and Strawn, Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
46677
Report Number(s):
ANL/CMT/CP-83389; CONF-941221-3
ON: DE95009908; TRN: AHC29513%%92
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12. International electric vehicle symposium, Anaheim, CA (United States), 5-7 Dec 1994; Other Information: PBD: Dec 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; SODIUM-SULFUR BATTERIES; TRANSPORT REGULATIONS; METAL-METAL BATTERIES; METAL-NONMETAL BATTERIES; ALUMINIUM; IRON SULFIDES; POLYMERS

Citation Formats

Henriksen, G, Hammel, C, and Altemos, E A. Lessons learned in acquiring new regulations for shipping advanced electric vehicle batteries. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Henriksen, G, Hammel, C, & Altemos, E A. Lessons learned in acquiring new regulations for shipping advanced electric vehicle batteries. United States.
Henriksen, G, Hammel, C, and Altemos, E A. 1994. "Lessons learned in acquiring new regulations for shipping advanced electric vehicle batteries". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/46677.
@article{osti_46677,
title = {Lessons learned in acquiring new regulations for shipping advanced electric vehicle batteries},
author = {Henriksen, G and Hammel, C and Altemos, E A},
abstractNote = {In 1990, the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the US Department of Energy established its ad hoc EV Battery Readiness Working Group to identify regulatory barriers to the commercialization of advanced EV battery technologies and facilitate the removal of these barriers. A Shipping Sub-Working Group (SSWG) was formed to address the regulatory issues associated with the domestic and international shipment of these new battery technologies. The SSWG invites major industrial developers of advanced battery technologies to join as members and work closely with appropriate domestic and international regulatory authorities to develop suitable regulations and procedures for the safe transport of these new battery technologies. This paper describes the domestic and international regulatory processes for the transport of dangerous goods; reviews the status of shipping regulations for sodium-beta and lithium batteries; and delineates the lessons learned to date in this process. The sodium-beta battery family was the first category of advanced EV batteries to be addressed by the SSWG. It includes both sodium/sulfur and sodium/metal chloride batteries. Their efforts led to the establishment of a UN number (UN 3292) in the UN Recommendations, for cold cells and batteries, and establishment of a US Department of Transportation general exemption (DOT-E-10917) covering cold and hot batteries, as well as cold cells. The lessons learned for sodium-beta batteries, over the period of 1990--94, are now being applied to the development of regulations for shipping a new generation of lithium battery technologies (lithium-polymer and lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries).},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/46677}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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