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Title: Model study of atmospheric transport using carbon 14 and strontium 90 as inert tracers

Abstract

The observed excess carbon 14 in the atmosphere from 1963 to 1970 provides unique, but limited, data up to an altitude of about 35 km for testing the air motions calculated by 11 multidimensional atmospheric models. Strontium 90 measurements in the atmosphere from 1964 to mid-1967 provide data that have more latitude coverage than those of carbon 14 and are useful for testing combined models of air motions and aerosol settling. Model calculations for carbon 14 begin at October 1963, 9 months after the conclusion of the nuclear bomb tests; the initial conditions for the calculations are derived by three methods, each of which agrees fairly well with measured carbon 14 in October 1963 and each of which has widely different values in regions of the stratosphere where there were no carbon 14 measurements. The model results are compared to the stratospheric measurements, not as if the observed data were absolute standards, but in an effort to obtain new insight about the models and about the atmosphere. The measured carbon 14 vertical profiles at 31 deg N are qualitatively different from all of the models; the measured vertical profiles show a maximum mixing ratio in the altitude range of 20more » to 25 km from October 1963 through July 1966, but all modeled profiles show mixing ratio maxima that increase in altitude from 20 km in October 1963 to greater than 40 km by April 1966. Both carbon 14 and strontium 90 data indicate that the models differ substantially among themselves with respect to stratosphere-troposphere exchange rate, but the modeled carbon 14 stratospheric residence times indicate that differences among the models are small with respect to transport rate between the middle stratosphere and the lower stratosphere. Strontium 90 data indicate that aerosol settling is important up to at least 35 km altitude. (Abstract Truncated)« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
46331
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: D10; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON 14; ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION; STRONTIUM 90; AIR POLLUTION; MONITORING; STRATOSPHERE

Citation Formats

Kinnison, D.E., Johnston, H.S., and Wuebbles, D.J. Model study of atmospheric transport using carbon 14 and strontium 90 as inert tracers. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1029/94JD01822.
Kinnison, D.E., Johnston, H.S., & Wuebbles, D.J. Model study of atmospheric transport using carbon 14 and strontium 90 as inert tracers. United States. doi:10.1029/94JD01822.
Kinnison, D.E., Johnston, H.S., and Wuebbles, D.J. Sat . "Model study of atmospheric transport using carbon 14 and strontium 90 as inert tracers". United States. doi:10.1029/94JD01822.
@article{osti_46331,
title = {Model study of atmospheric transport using carbon 14 and strontium 90 as inert tracers},
author = {Kinnison, D.E. and Johnston, H.S. and Wuebbles, D.J.},
abstractNote = {The observed excess carbon 14 in the atmosphere from 1963 to 1970 provides unique, but limited, data up to an altitude of about 35 km for testing the air motions calculated by 11 multidimensional atmospheric models. Strontium 90 measurements in the atmosphere from 1964 to mid-1967 provide data that have more latitude coverage than those of carbon 14 and are useful for testing combined models of air motions and aerosol settling. Model calculations for carbon 14 begin at October 1963, 9 months after the conclusion of the nuclear bomb tests; the initial conditions for the calculations are derived by three methods, each of which agrees fairly well with measured carbon 14 in October 1963 and each of which has widely different values in regions of the stratosphere where there were no carbon 14 measurements. The model results are compared to the stratospheric measurements, not as if the observed data were absolute standards, but in an effort to obtain new insight about the models and about the atmosphere. The measured carbon 14 vertical profiles at 31 deg N are qualitatively different from all of the models; the measured vertical profiles show a maximum mixing ratio in the altitude range of 20 to 25 km from October 1963 through July 1966, but all modeled profiles show mixing ratio maxima that increase in altitude from 20 km in October 1963 to greater than 40 km by April 1966. Both carbon 14 and strontium 90 data indicate that the models differ substantially among themselves with respect to stratosphere-troposphere exchange rate, but the modeled carbon 14 stratospheric residence times indicate that differences among the models are small with respect to transport rate between the middle stratosphere and the lower stratosphere. Strontium 90 data indicate that aerosol settling is important up to at least 35 km altitude. (Abstract Truncated)},
doi = {10.1029/94JD01822},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research},
number = D10,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {10}
}