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Title: NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNIQUES FOR RESEARCH AND PROCESS CONTROL

Abstract

Non-destructive test methods have been used primarily for the detection of defects and the rejection of faulty materials. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found it valuable to employ special non-destructive testing techniques as aids in materials research, component development, and process control. This paper gives three recent examples of the evolution of non-destructive testing techniques from research to process control. A current fuel-element design contains fuel pins filled with vibratorily compacted uranium and thorium oxide powder. A gamma-attenuation technique was developed to allow the homogeneity of fuel loading to be measured and was used to aid the development of fabrication techniques and equipment. Later an inspection device was built to operate remotely in a hermetically sealed and shielded facility and used for production process control. Another fuel element required fuel plates containing a uranium oxide-aluminium dispersion core with a programmed variation in the fuel loading across the width. A continuous scanning, X-ray attenuation technique was developed and used to measure fuel inhomogeneities and conformity to design contour. The technique assisted the development for both core pressing and plate-rolling practices. A system was constructed for rapid automatic evaluation of production fuel plates. These fuel plates were pressed into involute shapemore » and assembled with alternate cooling channels. Stringent heat-transfer requirements imposed a tight tolerance on the channel dimensions. A unique eddy-current device using the ''lift-off'' characteristic was invented to insert in the very narrow channel and allow recording of dimensions both during fabrication development and actual manufacture. Another approach to fuel elements is the use of minute fuel-bearing particles coated with pyrolytic carbon to retain the fission products. Of concern are the core diameter, coating thickness and integrity, and presence of fuel in the coating. Development of micro radiographic techniques has provided a powerful tool to evaluate the many variables in the coating process for optimum fabrication. Further application allows the evaluation of the effects of service including heat treatment and in-reactor testing. Results of these studies assist the realistic evaluation of production lots and the recycle of information to correct discrepancies.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN
Sponsoring Org.:
US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC)
OSTI Identifier:
4625803
Report Number(s):
ORNL-P-1188; CONF-650511-1
NSA Number:
NSA-19-022508
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-26
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Non-Destructive Testing in Nuclear Technology Vol. II Proceedings of a Symposium on Non-Destructive Testing in Nuclear Technology, INIS
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: II; Conference: Symposium on Non-Destructive Testing in Nuclear Technology, Bucharest, Romania, May 17-21, 1965; Other Information: CONF-650511-1; From Symposium on Non-Destructive Testing in Nuclear Technology, Bucharest. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-65
Publisher:
INIS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
ENGINEERING; Materials Testing; ABSORPTION; ALUMINUM; CARBON; CERAMICS; COATING; COMPACTING; CONFERENCE; CONFIGURATION; CONTROL; DISPERSIONS; FABRICATION; FUEL ELEMENTS; GAMMA RADIATION; HOMOGENEOUS REACTORS; INSPECTION; INSTRUMENTS; MATERIALS TESTING; MEASURED VALUES; MIXING; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; PARTICLES; POWDERS; PRESSING; PRESSURE; PYROLYTIC CARBON; RADIOGRAPHY; RODS; ROLLING; ROMANIA; SEALS; SHIELDING; THICKNESS; THORIUM OXIDES; URANIUM DIOXIDE; X RADIATION

Citation Formats

Douglas, Jr., D. A., McClung, R. W., Foster, B. E., and Dodd, C. V. NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNIQUES FOR RESEARCH AND PROCESS CONTROL. United States: N. p., 1965. Web.
Douglas, Jr., D. A., McClung, R. W., Foster, B. E., & Dodd, C. V. NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNIQUES FOR RESEARCH AND PROCESS CONTROL. United States.
Douglas, Jr., D. A., McClung, R. W., Foster, B. E., and Dodd, C. V. Fri . "NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNIQUES FOR RESEARCH AND PROCESS CONTROL". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4625803.
@article{osti_4625803,
title = {NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNIQUES FOR RESEARCH AND PROCESS CONTROL},
author = {Douglas, Jr., D. A. and McClung, R. W. and Foster, B. E. and Dodd, C. V.},
abstractNote = {Non-destructive test methods have been used primarily for the detection of defects and the rejection of faulty materials. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found it valuable to employ special non-destructive testing techniques as aids in materials research, component development, and process control. This paper gives three recent examples of the evolution of non-destructive testing techniques from research to process control. A current fuel-element design contains fuel pins filled with vibratorily compacted uranium and thorium oxide powder. A gamma-attenuation technique was developed to allow the homogeneity of fuel loading to be measured and was used to aid the development of fabrication techniques and equipment. Later an inspection device was built to operate remotely in a hermetically sealed and shielded facility and used for production process control. Another fuel element required fuel plates containing a uranium oxide-aluminium dispersion core with a programmed variation in the fuel loading across the width. A continuous scanning, X-ray attenuation technique was developed and used to measure fuel inhomogeneities and conformity to design contour. The technique assisted the development for both core pressing and plate-rolling practices. A system was constructed for rapid automatic evaluation of production fuel plates. These fuel plates were pressed into involute shape and assembled with alternate cooling channels. Stringent heat-transfer requirements imposed a tight tolerance on the channel dimensions. A unique eddy-current device using the ''lift-off'' characteristic was invented to insert in the very narrow channel and allow recording of dimensions both during fabrication development and actual manufacture. Another approach to fuel elements is the use of minute fuel-bearing particles coated with pyrolytic carbon to retain the fission products. Of concern are the core diameter, coating thickness and integrity, and presence of fuel in the coating. Development of micro radiographic techniques has provided a powerful tool to evaluate the many variables in the coating process for optimum fabrication. Further application allows the evaluation of the effects of service including heat treatment and in-reactor testing. Results of these studies assist the realistic evaluation of production lots and the recycle of information to correct discrepancies.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/4625803}, journal = {Non-Destructive Testing in Nuclear Technology Vol. II Proceedings of a Symposium on Non-Destructive Testing in Nuclear Technology, INIS},
number = ,
volume = II,
place = {United States},
year = {1965},
month = {1}
}

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