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Title: Biomass Crop Production: Benefits for Soil Quality and Carbon Sequestration

Abstract

Research at three locations in the southeastern US is quantifying changes in soil quality and soil carbon storage that occur during production of biomass crops compared with row crops. After three growing seasons, soil quality improved and soil carbon storage increased on plots planted to cottonwood, sycamore, sweetgum with a cover crop, switchgrass, and no-till corn. For tree crops, sequestered belowground carbon was found mainly in stumps and large roots. At the TN site, the coarse woody organic matter storage belowground was 1.3 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}yr{sup {minus}1}, of which 79% was stumps and large roots and 21% fine roots. Switchgrass at the AL site also stored considerable carbon belowground as coarse roots. Most of the carbon storage occurred mainly in the upper 30 cw although coarse roots were found to depths of greater than 60 cm. Biomass crops contributed to improvements in soil physical quality as well as increasing belowground carbon sequestration. The distribution and extent of carbon sequestration depends on the growth characteristics and age of the individual biomass crop species. Time and increasing crop maturity will determine the potential of these biomass crops to significantly contribute to the overall national goal of increasing carbon sequestration and reducing greenhousemore » gas emissions.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Solar Thermal, Biomass Power, and Hydrogen Technologies (EE-13) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
4603
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CP-102201; EB 52 03 00 0
EB 52 03 00 0; TRN: AH200114%%228
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 4th Biomass Conference of the Americas, Oakland, CA (US), 08/29/1999--09/02/1999; Other Information: PBD: 29 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIOMASS; CARBON; CROPS; ORGANIC MATTER; PRODUCTION; SOILS; BIOMASS CROP PRODUCTION

Citation Formats

Bandaranayake, W., Bock, B.R., Houston, A., Joslin, J.D., Pettry, D.E., Schoenholtz, S., Thornton, F.C., Tolbert, V.R., and Tyler, D. Biomass Crop Production: Benefits for Soil Quality and Carbon Sequestration. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Bandaranayake, W., Bock, B.R., Houston, A., Joslin, J.D., Pettry, D.E., Schoenholtz, S., Thornton, F.C., Tolbert, V.R., & Tyler, D. Biomass Crop Production: Benefits for Soil Quality and Carbon Sequestration. United States.
Bandaranayake, W., Bock, B.R., Houston, A., Joslin, J.D., Pettry, D.E., Schoenholtz, S., Thornton, F.C., Tolbert, V.R., and Tyler, D. Sun . "Biomass Crop Production: Benefits for Soil Quality and Carbon Sequestration". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4603.
@article{osti_4603,
title = {Biomass Crop Production: Benefits for Soil Quality and Carbon Sequestration},
author = {Bandaranayake, W. and Bock, B.R. and Houston, A. and Joslin, J.D. and Pettry, D.E. and Schoenholtz, S. and Thornton, F.C. and Tolbert, V.R. and Tyler, D.},
abstractNote = {Research at three locations in the southeastern US is quantifying changes in soil quality and soil carbon storage that occur during production of biomass crops compared with row crops. After three growing seasons, soil quality improved and soil carbon storage increased on plots planted to cottonwood, sycamore, sweetgum with a cover crop, switchgrass, and no-till corn. For tree crops, sequestered belowground carbon was found mainly in stumps and large roots. At the TN site, the coarse woody organic matter storage belowground was 1.3 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}yr{sup {minus}1}, of which 79% was stumps and large roots and 21% fine roots. Switchgrass at the AL site also stored considerable carbon belowground as coarse roots. Most of the carbon storage occurred mainly in the upper 30 cw although coarse roots were found to depths of greater than 60 cm. Biomass crops contributed to improvements in soil physical quality as well as increasing belowground carbon sequestration. The distribution and extent of carbon sequestration depends on the growth characteristics and age of the individual biomass crop species. Time and increasing crop maturity will determine the potential of these biomass crops to significantly contribute to the overall national goal of increasing carbon sequestration and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
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