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Title: National symposium for EPA and industry - fugitive emissions: Streamlining implementation and compliance

Abstract

The proceedings of the National Symposium for EPA and Industry on Fugitive Emissions: Streamlining Implementation and Compliance are presented. The Conference was held January 11-12, 1996 in New Orleans, LA. Information is presented on negotiated rules for equipment leaks; the Clean Air Act Title V operating permit program; legal issues related to fugitive emissions; maximum achievable control technology; leak detection and repair inspections; technical, monitoring, and modeling considerations; Title V and the mining industry; streamlining implementation and compliance; practical experience with Title V: controlling workplace emissions; post Title V: Maintaining compliance; factors that affect the accuracy of Method 21; estimating fugitive emissions; and fugitive emissions measurement techniques.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
457478
Report Number(s):
CONF-960151-
TRN: 96:006127-0001
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: National fugitive emissions conference, New Orleans, LA (United States), 11-12 Jan 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; POLLUTANTS; MEETINGS; EMISSION; LEADING ABSTRACT; IMPLEMENTATION; COMPLIANCE; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; WASTE DISPOSAL; US EPA; STATIONARY POLLUTANT SOURCES

Citation Formats

NONE. National symposium for EPA and industry - fugitive emissions: Streamlining implementation and compliance. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
NONE. National symposium for EPA and industry - fugitive emissions: Streamlining implementation and compliance. United States.
NONE. Tue . "National symposium for EPA and industry - fugitive emissions: Streamlining implementation and compliance". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_457478,
title = {National symposium for EPA and industry - fugitive emissions: Streamlining implementation and compliance},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {The proceedings of the National Symposium for EPA and Industry on Fugitive Emissions: Streamlining Implementation and Compliance are presented. The Conference was held January 11-12, 1996 in New Orleans, LA. Information is presented on negotiated rules for equipment leaks; the Clean Air Act Title V operating permit program; legal issues related to fugitive emissions; maximum achievable control technology; leak detection and repair inspections; technical, monitoring, and modeling considerations; Title V and the mining industry; streamlining implementation and compliance; practical experience with Title V: controlling workplace emissions; post Title V: Maintaining compliance; factors that affect the accuracy of Method 21; estimating fugitive emissions; and fugitive emissions measurement techniques.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The practical aspects of implementing and complying with fugitive emissions regulations are outlined. The study discusses the status of fugitive emissions; leak detection and repair (LDAR) needs; and improvement approach. Conclusions are discussed.
  • An overview is provided for the Fugitive Emissions System (FES) that has been implemented at Occidental Chemical in conjunction with the computer-based maintenance system called PassPort{reg_sign} developed by Indus Corporation. The goal of PassPort{reg_sign} FES program has been to interface with facilities data, equipment information, work standards and work orders. Along the way, several implementation hurdles had to be overcome before a monitoring and regulatory system could be standardized for the appropriate maintenance, process and environmental groups. This presentation includes step-by-step account of several case studies that developed during the implementation of the FES system.
  • Fugitive emissions must be considered by Portland cement plants in the determination of status as a major source under Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Once a facility has been determined to be major, fugitive emission sources must be included in the operating permit application. Emission inventories conducted by SCI-TECH, INC. at cement plants have shown that the overall particulate emissions from fugitive sources can be significantly greater than the overall particulate emissions from point sources. Since application fees, emissions trading and offset programs, and other portions of the Act relate directly to emission levels, itmore » is important that the cement industry understand the need for an accurate emission inventory of fugitive emissions sources. This paper presents information on how to develop such an inventory.« less
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  • Within the federal government there is a new era of increased mutual involvement and cooperation between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the protection of the health and safety of the general public and environment. With the increased interaction between DOE, EPA, and state agencies concerning hazardous waste, analytical laboratories must reevaluate their quality assurance (QA) programs. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initially implemented a QA program using appropriate requirements from the voluntary consensus standard ANSI/ASME NQA-1. Increased interaction with the EPA has dictated the need to consider the QA requirements for analytical activitiesmore » associated with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which are addressed in Chapter 1 of the EPA document, Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste (SW-846). PNL has determined that the RCRA QA requirements can easily fit within the NQA-1 structure. Both programs have benefits to offer the analytical laboratory.« less