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Title: Implementation of Title V in California

Abstract

This presentation provides information on California`s Title V operating permit programs for stationary sources mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. It covers background, applicability, regulatory history, requirements, and issues. In addition, specific information is provided on the progress of Title V implementation in California, including: the roles of implementing agencies, the status of district Title V programs, number and distribution of Title V sources, cost of Title V implementation, and highlights of Title V implementation in the State. The question and answer format is intended to facilitate easy access to specific information related to the Title V operating permit programs in California.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
451998
Report Number(s):
CONF-9611118-
TRN: IM9715%%30
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: HazMat West `96. International environmental management and technology conference and exhibition, Long Beach, CA (United States), 5-7 Nov 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of 12. annual environmental management and technology conference west -- HazMat `96 west: Technical papers; PB: 544 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; CLEAN AIR ACTS; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; AIR POLLUTION; LICENSES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL

Citation Formats

Werner, B., and Cook, B. Implementation of Title V in California. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Werner, B., & Cook, B. Implementation of Title V in California. United States.
Werner, B., and Cook, B. 1996. "Implementation of Title V in California". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_451998,
title = {Implementation of Title V in California},
author = {Werner, B. and Cook, B.},
abstractNote = {This presentation provides information on California`s Title V operating permit programs for stationary sources mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. It covers background, applicability, regulatory history, requirements, and issues. In addition, specific information is provided on the progress of Title V implementation in California, including: the roles of implementing agencies, the status of district Title V programs, number and distribution of Title V sources, cost of Title V implementation, and highlights of Title V implementation in the State. The question and answer format is intended to facilitate easy access to specific information related to the Title V operating permit programs in California.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • In 1990, the Clean Air Act was amended amidst a flurry of lobbying. One of the special provisions added was Section 404(d) (see also 40 CFR 72.42) to extend the deadline for compliance under Title IV from 1995 to 1997 for units that committed to install high-efficiency SO{sub 2} scrubbers. Title IV created the Acid Rain Program to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from electric utility boilers. Section 404(d) was added as a result of the efforts to encourage the continued use of high sulfur coal. Congress allocated 3.5 million allowances for EPA to award under thesemore » provisions. To reduce the uncertainty of being selected to receive extension allowances through EPA`s lottery system, utilities interested in participating in the Program formed the Extension Allowance Pool. The Extension Allowance Pooling Agreement was executed as of March 1992 by 16 utilities. The underlying principle of the Pool is that those utilities whose control units were selected to receive extension allowances would share a portion of those allowances with those Pool participants that were not chosen by EPA. The Pool also provided for the various activities required to implement these arrangements.« less
  • Title III, Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to promulgate regulations to prevent accidental releases of regulated substances and to reduce the severity of those releases that do occur. The final EPA rule for Risk Management Programs under Section 112(r)(7) of the CAA, promulgated June 20, 1996, applies to all stationary sources with processes that contain more than a threshold quantity of any of 139 regulated substances listed under 40 CFR 68.130. All affected sources will be required to prepare a risk management plan which must be submitted tomore » EPA and be made available to state and local governments and to the public. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of the Prevention of Accidental Release Rule. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the K-25 Site. The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the K-25 Site conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. ORR activities underway and soon to be undertaken toward implementation of the Prevention of Accidental Release Rule include: compilation of inventories of regulated substances at all processes at each of the three ORR Facilities for determination of affected processes and facilities; plans for inventory reduction to levels below threshold quantities, where necessary and feasible; determination of the overlap of processes subject to the OSHA PSM Standard and determination of parallel requirements; preparation of Risk Management Plans and Programs for affected processes and facilities including detailed requirements for hazard assessment, prevention, and emergency response.« less
  • The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 forced many sources to apply for permits and be subject to both state and federal oversight through the operating permit programs implemented under Title V. In order to comply with new permit provisions, many sources were forced to develop and implement complex programs that would both ensure compliance and allow maximum operating flexibility. Although no material tracking or reporting system existed before the Learjet facility became subject to Title V, careful planning and use of the proper tools and procedures allowed the implementation of a facility-wide data management and compliance reporting system thatmore » is not process dependent, allows maximum operating flexibility, and adds relatively few inconveniences to operations personnel. Also, as new requirements become effective in the coming years, the flexibility of the system allows it to be easily modified by facility personnel.« less
  • Title V of the Clean Air Act (CAA) establishes a new permit program requiring major sources and sources subject to Title III (Hazardous Air Pollutants) to obtain a state operating permit. Historically, most states have issued operating permits for individual emission units. Under the Title V permit program, a single permit will be issued for all of the emission units at the facility much like the current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program. The permit will specify all reporting, monitoring, and record-keeping requirements for the facility. Sources required to obtain permits include (a) major sources that emit 100more » tons per year or more of any criteria air contaminant, (b) any source subject to the HAP provisions of Title III, (c) any source subject to the acid rain provisions of Title IV, (d) any source subject to New Source Performance Standards, and (e) any source subject to new source review under the nonattainment or Prevention of Significant Deterioration provisions. The State of Tennessee Title V Operating Permit Program was approved by EPA on August 28, 1996. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title V Operating Permit Program. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the ETTP conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. Each of the three DOE Facilities is considered a major source under Title V of the CAA.« less
  • California Title 23 and the Solid Waste Assessment Test (SWAT) program, as administered by the Regional Water Quality Control Boards (RWQCB), require extensive characterization and monitoring of waste disposal sites. Typical SWAT/Title 23 investigations require multiple characterization boreholes in addition to groundwater and unsaturated zone monitoring. In an arid environment such as the southwestern San Joaquin Valley, many of these requirements become impracticable. Regions such as these are often characterized by extreme depths to groundwater, non-potable groundwater, and moisture deficient and hydrocompacted soils. Through the use of oil-field data, an accurate portrayal of subsurface conditions at a SWAT-ranked site wasmore » possible. Because of the extensive background material available and the relatively benign nature of the site, a single borehole was deemed by the REQCB to be an acceptable characterization of the site. As predicted from the background data review, this borehole was drilled to 1,000 ft in depth without encountering a water-saturated interval capable of yielding a sample. In addition, oil-saturated intervals were encountered beneath the site as predicted.« less