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Title: California environmental regulatory climate: Linking regulation to specific concerns

Abstract

This paper focuses on three areas of change which are aimed at recognizing and taking advantage of the benefits offered by the tremendous body of information and knowledge now available in the realm of environmental protection and regulation: Comprehensive re-evaluation and reform of California`s hazardous waste management regulatory program through the Department of Toxic Substances Control`s (DTSC) Regulatory Structure Update (RSU), which is designed to eliminate unnecessary regulatory burden while retaining requirements needed to protect the citizens and environment of California; Consolidation of governmental oversight functions in the areas of hazardous materials and hazardous waste at the local level through certified unified program agencies (CUPAs), providing for more effective and efficient utilization of limited governmental resources; Development of environmental management standards and systems and compliance assurance plans and programs to shift regulatory emphasis away from pre-operational regulatory agency command and control review and approval towards self-responsibility and self-evaluation on the part of California businesses with regulatory agencies emphasizing compliance assistance and enforcement targeted at bad actors. Together, these program reforms and redirections, when fully implemented, will substantially alter and improve the environmental regulatory climate for California business, while effectively protecting the environment and health of all Californians.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
451995
Report Number(s):
CONF-9611118-
TRN: IM9715%%27
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: HazMat West `96. International environmental management and technology conference and exhibition, Long Beach, CA (United States), 5-7 Nov 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of 12. annual environmental management and technology conference west -- HazMat `96 west: Technical papers; PB: 544 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; WASTE MANAGEMENT; CALIFORNIA; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS

Citation Formats

Rauh, T.N.. California environmental regulatory climate: Linking regulation to specific concerns. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Rauh, T.N.. California environmental regulatory climate: Linking regulation to specific concerns. United States.
Rauh, T.N.. 1996. "California environmental regulatory climate: Linking regulation to specific concerns". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_451995,
title = {California environmental regulatory climate: Linking regulation to specific concerns},
author = {Rauh, T.N.},
abstractNote = {This paper focuses on three areas of change which are aimed at recognizing and taking advantage of the benefits offered by the tremendous body of information and knowledge now available in the realm of environmental protection and regulation: Comprehensive re-evaluation and reform of California`s hazardous waste management regulatory program through the Department of Toxic Substances Control`s (DTSC) Regulatory Structure Update (RSU), which is designed to eliminate unnecessary regulatory burden while retaining requirements needed to protect the citizens and environment of California; Consolidation of governmental oversight functions in the areas of hazardous materials and hazardous waste at the local level through certified unified program agencies (CUPAs), providing for more effective and efficient utilization of limited governmental resources; Development of environmental management standards and systems and compliance assurance plans and programs to shift regulatory emphasis away from pre-operational regulatory agency command and control review and approval towards self-responsibility and self-evaluation on the part of California businesses with regulatory agencies emphasizing compliance assistance and enforcement targeted at bad actors. Together, these program reforms and redirections, when fully implemented, will substantially alter and improve the environmental regulatory climate for California business, while effectively protecting the environment and health of all Californians.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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