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Title: Removal of arsenic and selenium from wastewaters - a review

Abstract

Arsenic and selenium are found in low quantities together with other metals in several nonferrous metallurgical process streams such as scrubber blowdown solution, acid plant wastewater, gas cleaning plant water, etc. Normally, the other metals in these streams are present as cations and can be precipitated by conventional lime treatment and sulfide polishing. However, arsenic and selenium are invariably present as anions, AsO{sub 3}{sup 3-} and AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-} in the case of arsenic and SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for selenium. Conventional lime treatment removes most of the arsenic, but it does not remove selenium. The present paper reviews the processes and technologies developed to date on the removal of arsenic and selenium from metallurgical process streams. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Asarco Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
447192
Report Number(s):
CONF-961018-
TRN: 97:000327-0018
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS) fall extraction and process metallurgy meeting, Scottsdale, AZ (United States), 27-30 Oct 1996; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Second international symposium on extraction and processing for the treatment and minimization of wastes - 1996; Ramachandran, V.; Nesbitt, C.C. [eds.]; PB: 870 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; WASTE WATER; WASTE PROCESSING; SELENIUM; SEPARATION PROCESSES; ARSENIC; ADSORPTION; ION EXCHANGE; OSMOSIS; REDUCTION

Citation Formats

Mirza, A.H., and Ramachandran, V.. Removal of arsenic and selenium from wastewaters - a review. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Mirza, A.H., & Ramachandran, V.. Removal of arsenic and selenium from wastewaters - a review. United States.
Mirza, A.H., and Ramachandran, V.. 1996. "Removal of arsenic and selenium from wastewaters - a review". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_447192,
title = {Removal of arsenic and selenium from wastewaters - a review},
author = {Mirza, A.H. and Ramachandran, V.},
abstractNote = {Arsenic and selenium are found in low quantities together with other metals in several nonferrous metallurgical process streams such as scrubber blowdown solution, acid plant wastewater, gas cleaning plant water, etc. Normally, the other metals in these streams are present as cations and can be precipitated by conventional lime treatment and sulfide polishing. However, arsenic and selenium are invariably present as anions, AsO{sub 3}{sup 3-} and AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-} in the case of arsenic and SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for selenium. Conventional lime treatment removes most of the arsenic, but it does not remove selenium. The present paper reviews the processes and technologies developed to date on the removal of arsenic and selenium from metallurgical process streams. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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