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Title: Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

Abstract

The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a widemore » range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
447157
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-430-21968-Vol.1; CONF-9605195-Vol.1
ON: DE97000053; TRN: 97:001172-0026
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1996 annual hydrogen peer review for DOE, Miami, FL (United States), 1-3 May 1996; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 1996 US DOE hydrogen program review. Volume 1; PB: 575 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN FUEL; NATURAL GAS; CATALYTIC CRACKING; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; CATALYSTS

Citation Formats

Muradov, N. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Muradov, N. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. United States.
Muradov, N. Tue . "Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/447157.
@article{osti_447157,
title = {Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas},
author = {Muradov, N},
abstractNote = {The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {10}
}

Conference:
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