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Title: Temperature influences on root growth for Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae), Pleuraphis rigida (Poaceae), and Agave deserti (Agavaceae) under current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations

Abstract

To help evaluate root distribution patterns, elongation rates of individual roots were measured as a function of soil temperature for Encelia farinosa (a C{sub 3} species), Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4}), and Agave deserti (CAM), sympatric codominants in the northwestern Donoran Desert. Measurements were made at current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations under winter and summer conditions of air temperature (day/night temperatures of 17 C/10 C and 33 C/22 C, respectively). The three species had different optimal temperatures for root elongation (T{sub opt}) under winter conditions (25 C for E. farinosa, 35 C for P. rigida, and 30 C for A. deserti); T{sub opt} increased by 2-3 C under summer conditions for all three species. The limiting temperatures for elongation also acclimated from winter to summer conditions. The rate of root elongation at T{sub opt} was higher under summer than winter conditions for E. farinosa and P. rigida reflecting conditions for maximum photosynthesis; no difference occurred for A. deserti. Decreased elongation rates at extreme temperatures were associated with less cell division and reduced cell extension. The doubled CO{sub 2} concentration increased average daily root elongation rates for A. deserti under both winter (7%) and summer (12%) conditions, but had no effectmore » for the other two species. Simulations of root elongation as a function of soil temperatures showed that maximum elongation would occur at different depths and during different seasons, contributing to their niche separation. Shading of the soil surface moderated daily variations in soil temperature, reducing seasonal root elongation for winter and spring and increasing elongation for summer. Shading also altered root distribution patterns, e.g., optimal rooting depth for A. deserti and especially P. rigida increased for a hot summer day. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
437431
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
American Journal of Botany
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: PBD: Feb 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; CARBON DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS; AMBIENT TEMPERATURE; SOILS; PLANT GROWTH; ROOTS

Citation Formats

Drennan, P M, and Nobel, P S. Temperature influences on root growth for Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae), Pleuraphis rigida (Poaceae), and Agave deserti (Agavaceae) under current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2307/2445929.
Drennan, P M, & Nobel, P S. Temperature influences on root growth for Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae), Pleuraphis rigida (Poaceae), and Agave deserti (Agavaceae) under current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations. United States. https://doi.org/10.2307/2445929
Drennan, P M, and Nobel, P S. Thu . "Temperature influences on root growth for Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae), Pleuraphis rigida (Poaceae), and Agave deserti (Agavaceae) under current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations". United States. https://doi.org/10.2307/2445929.
@article{osti_437431,
title = {Temperature influences on root growth for Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae), Pleuraphis rigida (Poaceae), and Agave deserti (Agavaceae) under current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations},
author = {Drennan, P M and Nobel, P S},
abstractNote = {To help evaluate root distribution patterns, elongation rates of individual roots were measured as a function of soil temperature for Encelia farinosa (a C{sub 3} species), Pleuraphis rigida (C{sub 4}), and Agave deserti (CAM), sympatric codominants in the northwestern Donoran Desert. Measurements were made at current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations under winter and summer conditions of air temperature (day/night temperatures of 17 C/10 C and 33 C/22 C, respectively). The three species had different optimal temperatures for root elongation (T{sub opt}) under winter conditions (25 C for E. farinosa, 35 C for P. rigida, and 30 C for A. deserti); T{sub opt} increased by 2-3 C under summer conditions for all three species. The limiting temperatures for elongation also acclimated from winter to summer conditions. The rate of root elongation at T{sub opt} was higher under summer than winter conditions for E. farinosa and P. rigida reflecting conditions for maximum photosynthesis; no difference occurred for A. deserti. Decreased elongation rates at extreme temperatures were associated with less cell division and reduced cell extension. The doubled CO{sub 2} concentration increased average daily root elongation rates for A. deserti under both winter (7%) and summer (12%) conditions, but had no effect for the other two species. Simulations of root elongation as a function of soil temperatures showed that maximum elongation would occur at different depths and during different seasons, contributing to their niche separation. Shading of the soil surface moderated daily variations in soil temperature, reducing seasonal root elongation for winter and spring and increasing elongation for summer. Shading also altered root distribution patterns, e.g., optimal rooting depth for A. deserti and especially P. rigida increased for a hot summer day. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.2307/2445929},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/437431}, journal = {American Journal of Botany},
number = 2,
volume = 83,
place = {United States},
year = {1996},
month = {2}
}