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Title: Control of oscillations and NOx concentrations in ducted premixed flames by spray injection of water

Abstract

The antinodal rms pressure fluctuations of a ducted premixed flame has been reduced from 9 to 1.75 kPa by pulsed injection of water with heat removal of less than 3% of the total heat release of 150 kW. A corresponding benefit was the reduction in NO{sub x} emissions from 65 to 30 ppm. Several control strategies were considered and active control based on the oscillation of injection at the same phase as that of the oscillations was found to provide the best combination of attenuation and NO{sub x} reduction.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
435649
Report Number(s):
CONF-951135-
ISBN 0-7918-1751-2; TRN: IM9710%%307
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1995 International mechanical engineering congress and exhibition, San Francisco, CA (United States), 12-17 Nov 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the ASME Heat Transfer Division. Volume 2: Fire and combustion systems; Thermal-hydraulics in nuclear and hazardous waste processing and disposal; Transport phenomena in materials processing; HTD-Volume 317-2; Atreya, A. [ed.] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)]; Gritzo, L. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]; Saltiel, C. [ed.] [SCRAM Technology, Inc., Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others]; PB: 592 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; RAMJET ENGINES; NITROGEN OXIDES; COMBUSTION CONTROL; AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT; METHANE; KEROSENE; TEMPERATURE CONTROL; SPRAYS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Sivasegaram, S., Tsai, R.F., and Whitelaw, J.H.. Control of oscillations and NOx concentrations in ducted premixed flames by spray injection of water. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Sivasegaram, S., Tsai, R.F., & Whitelaw, J.H.. Control of oscillations and NOx concentrations in ducted premixed flames by spray injection of water. United States.
Sivasegaram, S., Tsai, R.F., and Whitelaw, J.H.. Sun . "Control of oscillations and NOx concentrations in ducted premixed flames by spray injection of water". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_435649,
title = {Control of oscillations and NOx concentrations in ducted premixed flames by spray injection of water},
author = {Sivasegaram, S. and Tsai, R.F. and Whitelaw, J.H.},
abstractNote = {The antinodal rms pressure fluctuations of a ducted premixed flame has been reduced from 9 to 1.75 kPa by pulsed injection of water with heat removal of less than 3% of the total heat release of 150 kW. A corresponding benefit was the reduction in NO{sub x} emissions from 65 to 30 ppm. Several control strategies were considered and active control based on the oscillation of injection at the same phase as that of the oscillations was found to provide the best combination of attenuation and NO{sub x} reduction.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

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