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Title: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields

Abstract

In an hypothesis-generating case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, lifetime occupational histories were obtained. The patients (n = 28) were clinic based. The occupational exposure of interest in this report is electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This is the first and so far the only exposure analyzed in this study. Occupational exposure up to 2 years prior to estimated disease symptom onset was used for construction of exposure indices for cases. Controls (n = 32) were blood and nonblood relatives of cases. Occupational exposure for controls was through the same age as exposure for the corresponding cases. Twenty (71%) cases and 28 (88%) controls had at least 20 years of work experience covering the exposure period. The occupational history and task data were used to classify blindly each occupation for each subject as having high, medium/high, medium, medium/low, or low EMF exposure, based primarily on data from an earlier and unrelated study designed to obtain occupational EMF exposure information on workers in ``electrical`` and ``nonelectrical`` jobs. By using the length of time each subject spent in each occupation through the exposure period, two indices of exposure were constructed: total occupational exposure (E{sub 1}) and average occupational exposure (E{sub 2}). For cases andmore » controls with at least 20 years of work experience, the odds ratio (OR) for exposure at the 75th percentile of the E{sub 1} case exposure data relative to minimum exposure was 7.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.4--38.1) and the corresponding OR for E{sub 2} was 5.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.3--22.5). For all cases and controls, the ORs were 2.5 (P < 0.1; 95% CI, 0.9--8.1) for E{sub 1} and 2.3 (P = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.8--6.6) for E{sub 2}. This study should be considered an hypothesis-generating study. Larger studies, using incident cases and improved exposure assessment, should be undertaken.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1];
  1. Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
435412
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bioelectromagnetics; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; PERSONNEL; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS

Citation Formats

Davanipour, Z., Sobel, E., Bowman, J.D., Qian, Z., and Will, A.D. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:1<28::AID-BEM6>3.0.CO;2-7.
Davanipour, Z., Sobel, E., Bowman, J.D., Qian, Z., & Will, A.D. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. United States. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:1<28::AID-BEM6>3.0.CO;2-7.
Davanipour, Z., Sobel, E., Bowman, J.D., Qian, Z., and Will, A.D. 1997. "Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields". United States. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:1<28::AID-BEM6>3.0.CO;2-7.
@article{osti_435412,
title = {Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields},
author = {Davanipour, Z. and Sobel, E. and Bowman, J.D. and Qian, Z. and Will, A.D.},
abstractNote = {In an hypothesis-generating case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, lifetime occupational histories were obtained. The patients (n = 28) were clinic based. The occupational exposure of interest in this report is electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This is the first and so far the only exposure analyzed in this study. Occupational exposure up to 2 years prior to estimated disease symptom onset was used for construction of exposure indices for cases. Controls (n = 32) were blood and nonblood relatives of cases. Occupational exposure for controls was through the same age as exposure for the corresponding cases. Twenty (71%) cases and 28 (88%) controls had at least 20 years of work experience covering the exposure period. The occupational history and task data were used to classify blindly each occupation for each subject as having high, medium/high, medium, medium/low, or low EMF exposure, based primarily on data from an earlier and unrelated study designed to obtain occupational EMF exposure information on workers in ``electrical`` and ``nonelectrical`` jobs. By using the length of time each subject spent in each occupation through the exposure period, two indices of exposure were constructed: total occupational exposure (E{sub 1}) and average occupational exposure (E{sub 2}). For cases and controls with at least 20 years of work experience, the odds ratio (OR) for exposure at the 75th percentile of the E{sub 1} case exposure data relative to minimum exposure was 7.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.4--38.1) and the corresponding OR for E{sub 2} was 5.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.3--22.5). For all cases and controls, the ORs were 2.5 (P < 0.1; 95% CI, 0.9--8.1) for E{sub 1} and 2.3 (P = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.8--6.6) for E{sub 2}. This study should be considered an hypothesis-generating study. Larger studies, using incident cases and improved exposure assessment, should be undertaken.},
doi = {10.1002/(SICI)1521-186X(1997)18:1<28::AID-BEM6>3.0.CO;2-7},
journal = {Bioelectromagnetics},
number = 1,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = 1997,
month = 3
}
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