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Title: THERMAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS. Period covered June 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957

Abstract

The objective of this program was the measurement of the high temperature thermal properties of materials. The materials investigated were Hastelloy B, Hastelloy C, Satellite 21, Stainless Steel type 17-7 P.H., Stainless Steel type 446, Sillcon Carbide, 60-15 Cr (ASTM B83-46), and beryllium. The thermal conductivity, specific heat, and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were measured from 1OOO deg to 3OOO deg F, or the melting point of the material, whichever was lower. All measurements were made in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Propulsion and Fluid Mechanics Research Department, Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology. Both the experimental measurements and the results of the conversion of these measurements to the desired physical properties are given. (auth)

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago. Armour Research Foundation
OSTI Identifier:
4336594
Report Number(s):
WADC-TR-57-487; AD-150954
NSA Number:
NSA-12-007267
DOE Contract Number:
AF33(616)-3701
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Project title: MATERIALS FOR GE-ANP SUBSYSTEMS. Task title: GE-ANP MATERIALS. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-58
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
MINERALOGY, METALLURGY, AND CERAMICS; BERYLLIUM; CHROMIUM; CHROMIUM ALLOYS; COBALT ALLOYS; EXPANSION; HASTELLOY; HIGH TEMPERATURE; MEASURED VALUES; MELTING POINTS; MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS; NICKEL ALLOYS; SILICIDES; SILICON CARBIDES; SPECIFIC HEAT; STAINLESS STEEL-17-7; STAINLESS STEELS; STELLITE; TEMPERATURE; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; THERMODYNAMICS; TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

Citation Formats

Fieldhouse, I.B., Hedge, J.C., Lang, J.I., and Waterman, T.E. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS. Period covered June 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957. United States: N. p., 1957. Web.
Fieldhouse, I.B., Hedge, J.C., Lang, J.I., & Waterman, T.E. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS. Period covered June 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957. United States.
Fieldhouse, I.B., Hedge, J.C., Lang, J.I., and Waterman, T.E. Fri . "THERMAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS. Period covered June 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_4336594,
title = {THERMAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS. Period covered June 1, 1956 to June 30, 1957},
author = {Fieldhouse, I.B. and Hedge, J.C. and Lang, J.I. and Waterman, T.E.},
abstractNote = {The objective of this program was the measurement of the high temperature thermal properties of materials. The materials investigated were Hastelloy B, Hastelloy C, Satellite 21, Stainless Steel type 17-7 P.H., Stainless Steel type 446, Sillcon Carbide, 60-15 Cr (ASTM B83-46), and beryllium. The thermal conductivity, specific heat, and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were measured from 1OOO deg to 3OOO deg F, or the melting point of the material, whichever was lower. All measurements were made in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Propulsion and Fluid Mechanics Research Department, Armour Research Foundation of Illinois Institute of Technology. Both the experimental measurements and the results of the conversion of these measurements to the desired physical properties are given. (auth)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 12 00:00:00 EDT 1957},
month = {Fri Jul 12 00:00:00 EDT 1957}
}

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  • An apparatus has been designed and constructed for measuring diffusivities up to about 1500 C. Values of thermal conductivity may be derived from thermal diffusivity values using density and heat capacity values. The apparatus was designed for measuremeuts on materials having thermal diffusivity values less than 0.1 cm/sup 2/sec such as most refraciory oxides at moderate to high temperatures. A radial heat flow method is used, heating the outside of a cylindrical sample at a constant rate and measuring the resulting radial temperature difference. Preliminary tests at moderate temperatures have indicated satisfactory performance in both precision and in ease ofmore » operation. The apparatss will be used tc measure thermal diffusivities of certainceramic materials which seem suitable as standards. (auth)« less
  • Equipment has been designed and built for tbe measurement of the specific heat, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of a series of ten metals and ceramics. These measurements are from about 1000 deg F to the melting point or 3000 deg F, whichever is lower. A vacuum dilatometer using a linear variable differential transformer as the sensing element has been used. A comparative method for measuring thermal conductivity hs been used. The heat capacity was determined with an ice calorimeter and its associated high temperature furnace designed to operate up to 5000 deg F. Data are presented for the expansionmore » of all of the test materials, Enthalpy, specific heat and thermal conductivity data were determined for only part of the materials. All data are presented graphically. (auth)« less
  • Using accurate apparatus and a drop'' method, the heat content (enthalpy) of Zr, five Zr hydrides (NH from 1.34 to 4.14), and stainless steel type 316 were measured over the range from 0 to 900 deg C. Using the values for the stainless steel and those from the literature for Mo and Nb, the heat capacities of typical clad samples of the hydrides may be computed additively. Thermal hysteresis of the hydrides was investigated in several cases. Corrections were applied for the impurities in the samples measured, but the two sets of hydrides gave heat values believed to be somewhatmore » inconsistent in the range 550 to 800 deg C through systematic differences in phase compositions. The heat content data were extensively correlated with certain published equilibrium data for the Zr-H in order to extend knowledge of the heats of hydriding, equilibrium H/sub 2/ pressures, and limits of solid solubility to wider ranges of temperature and composition than those covered by direct measurements. The results are discussed critically, and several structural implications are pointed out. (auth)« less
  • Structural components in high-speed aircraft and in missiles must function for short periods of time at high temperatures and at high stresses. The heating time and loading time in conventional tests for design data usually exceed those that apply in high-speed aircraft and in missiles. A study was made of the mechanical properties --- tensile, creep, fracture, compression, shear, and bending--- of several structural materials under conditions of moderate to rapid rates of heating and of loading. The materials involved in this investigation included electrolytic-tough-pitch copper, oxygen-free high- conductivity c opper, A-nickel, ingot iron, molybdenum, tantalum, Type GBH graphite, andmore » composite OFHC copper plus 316 stainless steel sheet. The testing temperatures ranged from room temperature to the melting points of the metals and to 5750 deg F for the graphite. The total heating, holding, and loading times to failure ranged from about three sec to about 30 min. Many of the tests were carried out both in air and in inert atmospheres. lt was found that the strength of the test metals decreased continuously with increasing temperatures. The graphite increased in strength up to 4500 deg F and then decreased in strength with further increases in temperature. With constant load and constant temperature and with transient load or transient temperature, the inherent load- carrying capacity of the metals increased with decreasing times under load. The inherent strength of the graphite was not significantly affected by variations in time under load. The mechanical properties of the copper and of the nickel test materials were not significantiy affected by exposure to air at temperatures up to their melting points within the time limitations of the various tests. Because of oxidation, the apparent strength of the iron, molybdenum, tantalum, and graphite decreased with increasing exposure times to air at elevated temperatures. (auth)« less