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Title: Problems with NIOSH method 2520 for methyl bromide

Abstract

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) publishes the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM), a collection of analytical methods for characterizing exposures to environmental chemicals. When an industrial hygienist selects a method to monitor worker exposure, it is important to remember that not all the methods in the NMAM have undergone the same level of evaluation, as the following case demonstrates. As part of an industrywide study of the health effects resulting from methyl bromide exposure in structural and agricultural applicators, NIOSH researchers conducted industrial hygiene monitoring for methyl bromide in Florida during July 1990. NIOSH method 2520 was used. This method recommends use of two charcoal tubes (400 mg/100 mg) in series, desorption with carbon disulfide, and analysis by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. Sampling results from these surveys indicated a capacity problem. A project was then initiated to determine the reason for the methyl bromide breakthrough that occurred during industrial hygiene monitoring. While conducting research to define and solve this problem, several other problems were identified: reduced adsorption capacity caused by high humidity, difficulty in preparing standard solutions, sample instability, change in recovery with loading, and insufficiently low quantitation limit. The addition ofmore » a drying tube to the sampling train, as well as changes to the analytical technique, to the desorption solvent, and to the time till analysis, resulted in an improved method for methyl bromide. This case study demonstrates the importance of noting the conditions under which a method was evaluated and the benefit of testing method performance under conditions likely to exist at a field site. 5 refs.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
433502
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: PBD: Mar 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; METHYL BROMIDE; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; MONITORING; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; SAMPLE PREPARATION; EVALUATION; US NIOSH; SAMPLING; FUMIGANTS

Citation Formats

Tharr, D. Problems with NIOSH method 2520 for methyl bromide. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1080/1047322X.1994.10388290.
Tharr, D. Problems with NIOSH method 2520 for methyl bromide. United States. doi:10.1080/1047322X.1994.10388290.
Tharr, D. Tue . "Problems with NIOSH method 2520 for methyl bromide". United States. doi:10.1080/1047322X.1994.10388290.
@article{osti_433502,
title = {Problems with NIOSH method 2520 for methyl bromide},
author = {Tharr, D.},
abstractNote = {The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) publishes the NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM), a collection of analytical methods for characterizing exposures to environmental chemicals. When an industrial hygienist selects a method to monitor worker exposure, it is important to remember that not all the methods in the NMAM have undergone the same level of evaluation, as the following case demonstrates. As part of an industrywide study of the health effects resulting from methyl bromide exposure in structural and agricultural applicators, NIOSH researchers conducted industrial hygiene monitoring for methyl bromide in Florida during July 1990. NIOSH method 2520 was used. This method recommends use of two charcoal tubes (400 mg/100 mg) in series, desorption with carbon disulfide, and analysis by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. Sampling results from these surveys indicated a capacity problem. A project was then initiated to determine the reason for the methyl bromide breakthrough that occurred during industrial hygiene monitoring. While conducting research to define and solve this problem, several other problems were identified: reduced adsorption capacity caused by high humidity, difficulty in preparing standard solutions, sample instability, change in recovery with loading, and insufficiently low quantitation limit. The addition of a drying tube to the sampling train, as well as changes to the analytical technique, to the desorption solvent, and to the time till analysis, resulted in an improved method for methyl bromide. This case study demonstrates the importance of noting the conditions under which a method was evaluated and the benefit of testing method performance under conditions likely to exist at a field site. 5 refs.},
doi = {10.1080/1047322X.1994.10388290},
journal = {Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene},
number = 3,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {3}
}