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Title: Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

Abstract

We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
433347
Report Number(s):
CONF-9604167-Vol.1
ON: DE96015306; TRN: 97:000720-0020
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Copper Mountain conference on iterative methods, Copper Mountain, CO (United States), 9-13 Apr 1996; Other Information: PBD: [1996]; Related Information: Is Part Of Copper Mountain conference on iterative methods: Proceedings: Volume 1; PB: 422 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; DIFFUSION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; CONVECTION; ITERATIVE METHODS; CONVERGENCE

Citation Formats

Mishev, I.D.. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Mishev, I.D.. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods. United States.
Mishev, I.D.. Tue . "Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/433347.
@article{osti_433347,
title = {Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods},
author = {Mishev, I.D.},
abstractNote = {We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
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