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Title: RESEARCH ON THE RADIATION STABILITY OF ORGANIC FLUIDS. Progress Report for January 1, 1953 through September 30, 1953. Report No. 6

Abstract

Additional knowledge was gained pertaining to effects of irradiation variables, chemical components, etc., on the stability of organics. This basic program was supplemented with an applied program wherein research was undertaken of particular irterest in reactor moderator-coolart and lubricant applications. Irradiations of the capsule type in the absence of air were conducted in the MTR, BNL, and X-10 reactors under a variety of conditions in investigations of effects of temperature, flux, dosage, and organic chemical structure. The MTR gamma facility and the California Research Co/sup 60/ source were also used. With highly aromatic organics, damage measured by viscosity change was found independent of irradiation temperature up to 371 deg C. Coke formation was minor, although it was universal at 426 deg C. Many fused ring and nonfused ring aromatics were stable at 371 deg C. Viscosity changes were slight, and gassing amounted to about 2 to 5 ml gas/ml fluid. Simple molecular distillations showed biphenyl, naphthalene, and 1,3-diphenylbenzene, to be 93 to 97% distillable, of which 72 to 81% was pure starting material. The stabilities of solutions of highly viscous polymers in low viscosity alkylbenzenes were studied in the presence of air with gamma radiation. Styrene-alkene copolymer, polyalkene, and polyestermore » solutions markedly decreased in viscosity on irradiation; whereas, polystyrene solutions merely increased slowly. Comparative stabilities of representative types of organics with combined neutron and gamma radiation allowed the tentative determination, based on viscosity change, that one fast neutron (>1 Mev) causes approximately 16 times the damage of one gamma (1.6 Mev). Thermal neutrons cause insignificant damage. As a result, it is suggested that the radiation dosage to cause damage be expressed in terms of "equivalent fast neutrons," a number obtained by adding to the number of fast neutrons the damage equivalent number each of gamma rays and epithermal neutrons. (auth)« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California Research Corp., Richmond, Calif.
Sponsoring Org.:
unavailable
OSTI Identifier:
4333233
Report Number(s):
TID-5148(Del.)
NSA Number:
NSA-12-000743
DOE Contract Number:  
AT(11-1)-174
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Decl. with deletions Feb. 7, 1957. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-58
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
CHEMISTRY; ALKENES; ALKYL RADICALS; AROMATICS; BEAMS; BENZENE; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COAL; COBALT 60; COOLANTS; DISTILLATION; EFFICIENCY; EPITHERMAL NEUTRONS; FLUIDS; FUSED SALTS; GAMMA RADIATION; IRRADIATION; LUBRICATION; MODERATORS; NAPHTHALENE; NEUTRONS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHENYL RADICALS; POLYESTERS; POLYMERS; POLYSTYRENE; QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; REACTORS; SOLUTIONS; STABILITY; STYRENE; TEMPERATURE; THERMAL NEUTRONS; USES; VISCOSITY

Citation Formats

None. RESEARCH ON THE RADIATION STABILITY OF ORGANIC FLUIDS. Progress Report for January 1, 1953 through September 30, 1953. Report No. 6. United States: N. p., 1953. Web. doi:10.2172/4333233.
None. RESEARCH ON THE RADIATION STABILITY OF ORGANIC FLUIDS. Progress Report for January 1, 1953 through September 30, 1953. Report No. 6. United States. doi:10.2172/4333233.
None. Fri . "RESEARCH ON THE RADIATION STABILITY OF ORGANIC FLUIDS. Progress Report for January 1, 1953 through September 30, 1953. Report No. 6". United States. doi:10.2172/4333233. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/4333233.
@article{osti_4333233,
title = {RESEARCH ON THE RADIATION STABILITY OF ORGANIC FLUIDS. Progress Report for January 1, 1953 through September 30, 1953. Report No. 6},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Additional knowledge was gained pertaining to effects of irradiation variables, chemical components, etc., on the stability of organics. This basic program was supplemented with an applied program wherein research was undertaken of particular irterest in reactor moderator-coolart and lubricant applications. Irradiations of the capsule type in the absence of air were conducted in the MTR, BNL, and X-10 reactors under a variety of conditions in investigations of effects of temperature, flux, dosage, and organic chemical structure. The MTR gamma facility and the California Research Co/sup 60/ source were also used. With highly aromatic organics, damage measured by viscosity change was found independent of irradiation temperature up to 371 deg C. Coke formation was minor, although it was universal at 426 deg C. Many fused ring and nonfused ring aromatics were stable at 371 deg C. Viscosity changes were slight, and gassing amounted to about 2 to 5 ml gas/ml fluid. Simple molecular distillations showed biphenyl, naphthalene, and 1,3-diphenylbenzene, to be 93 to 97% distillable, of which 72 to 81% was pure starting material. The stabilities of solutions of highly viscous polymers in low viscosity alkylbenzenes were studied in the presence of air with gamma radiation. Styrene-alkene copolymer, polyalkene, and polyester solutions markedly decreased in viscosity on irradiation; whereas, polystyrene solutions merely increased slowly. Comparative stabilities of representative types of organics with combined neutron and gamma radiation allowed the tentative determination, based on viscosity change, that one fast neutron (>1 Mev) causes approximately 16 times the damage of one gamma (1.6 Mev). Thermal neutrons cause insignificant damage. As a result, it is suggested that the radiation dosage to cause damage be expressed in terms of "equivalent fast neutrons," a number obtained by adding to the number of fast neutrons the damage equivalent number each of gamma rays and epithermal neutrons. (auth)},
doi = {10.2172/4333233},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Oct 30 00:00:00 EST 1953},
month = {Fri Oct 30 00:00:00 EST 1953}
}

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