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Title: Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice

Abstract

To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiatedmore » control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
433187
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: 15 Jul 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; RADIATION INJURIES; BIOLOGICAL MODELS; SKIN; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATION BURNS; RADIOPROTECTIVE SUBSTANCES; EVALUATION; GAMMA RADIATION; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; MICE; RADIATION DOSES; ALOE; GELS

Citation Formats

Roberts, D.B., and Travis, E.L. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00467-Y.
Roberts, D.B., & Travis, E.L. Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice. United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00467-Y.
Roberts, D.B., and Travis, E.L. Sat . "Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice". United States. doi:10.1016/0360-3016(94)00467-Y.
@article{osti_433187,
title = {Acemannan-containing wound dressing gel reduces radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice},
author = {Roberts, D.B. and Travis, E.L.},
abstractNote = {To determine (a) whether a wound dressing gel that contains acemannan extracted from aloe leaves affects the severity of radiation-induced acute skin reactions in C3H mice; (b) if so, whether other commercially available gels such as a personal lubricating jelly and a healing ointment have similar effects; and (c) when the wound dressing gel should be applied for maximum effect. Male C3H mice received graded single doses of gamma radiation ranging from 30 to 47.5 Gy to the right leg. In most experiments, the gel was applied daily beginning immediately after irradiation. Dose-response curves were obtained by plotting the percentage of mice that reached or exceeded a given peak skin reaction as a function of dose. Curves were fitted by logit analysis and ED{sub 50} values, and 95% confidence limits were obtained. The average peak skin reactions of the wound dressing gel-treated mice were lower than those of the untreated mice at all radiation doses tested. The ED{sub 50} values for skin reactions of 2.0-2.75 were approximately 7 Gy higher in the wound dressing gel-treated mice. The average peak skin reactions and the ED{sub 50} values for mice treated with personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment were similar to irradiated control values. Reduction in the percentage of mice with skin reactions of 2.5 or more was greatest in the groups that received wound dressing gel for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. There was no effect if gel was applied only before irradiation or beginning 1 week after irradiation. Wound dressing gel, but not personal lubricating jelly or healing ointment, reduces acute radiation-induced skin reactions in C3H mice if applied daily for at least 2 weeks beginning immediately after irradiation. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1016/0360-3016(94)00467-Y},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {7}
}