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Title: Ground-echo characteristics for a ground-target pulse-Doppler radar fuze of high duty ratio

Abstract

From Tri-service electronic fuse symposium; Washington, District of Columbia, USA (26 Nov 1973). A pulse-Doppler radar fuze for use against ground targets at high burst heights can operate at low peak power provided a high duty ratio is used. The high duty ratio brings about ambiguous ground return that is prevented from firing the fuze by randomly coding the phase of the transmitted pulses. This causes the ambiguous return to appear as random noise. This paper provides formulas for the calculation of the clutter-noise power density and of the signal power so that the performance of the radar can be determined. The paper also discusses the myth of decorrelation'' that is alleged to destroy the transmittedphase modulation in the echo and so make it useless. (auth)

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, N.Mex. (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
4328761
Report Number(s):
SLA-73-5997; CONF-731131-1
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: Tri-service electronic fuse symposium, Washington, District of Columbia, USA, 26 Nov 1973; Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 30-JUN-74
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
N80740* -General & Miscellaneous-Physics & Engineering; N46000 -Instrumentation; *ELECTRONIC GUIDANCE; *MISSILES- ELECTRONIC GUIDANCE; *RADAR- ELECTRIC FUSES; DOPPLER EFFECT; NOISE; PULSES; SIGNALS

Citation Formats

Williams, C.S.. Ground-echo characteristics for a ground-target pulse-Doppler radar fuze of high duty ratio. United States: N. p., 1973. Web.
Williams, C.S.. Ground-echo characteristics for a ground-target pulse-Doppler radar fuze of high duty ratio. United States.
Williams, C.S.. 1973. "Ground-echo characteristics for a ground-target pulse-Doppler radar fuze of high duty ratio". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_4328761,
title = {Ground-echo characteristics for a ground-target pulse-Doppler radar fuze of high duty ratio},
author = {Williams, C.S.},
abstractNote = {From Tri-service electronic fuse symposium; Washington, District of Columbia, USA (26 Nov 1973). A pulse-Doppler radar fuze for use against ground targets at high burst heights can operate at low peak power provided a high duty ratio is used. The high duty ratio brings about ambiguous ground return that is prevented from firing the fuze by randomly coding the phase of the transmitted pulses. This causes the ambiguous return to appear as random noise. This paper provides formulas for the calculation of the clutter-noise power density and of the signal power so that the performance of the radar can be determined. The paper also discusses the myth of decorrelation'' that is alleged to destroy the transmittedphase modulation in the echo and so make it useless. (auth)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1973,
month =
}

Technical Report:
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