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Title: DETERMINATION OF TENSILE, COMPRESSIVE, BEARING, AND SHEAR PROPERTIES OF SHEET STEELS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. Period covered : January 1957 to May 1958

Abstract

The tensile, compressive, bearing, and shear properties of the following sheet metals were determined at various temperatures after exposure times of from1/2 hour tc 1000 hours at the test temperature: A-286 austeaitic alloy, quenched and tempered; 17-7 PH stain less steel, RH 950 condition; Thermold J alloy steel, quenched and tempered; Type 420 stainless steel, quenched and tempered; Type 422 stainless steel, quenched and tempered; and 17-22 A (S) alloy steel, quenched and tempered. The A-286 alloy was tested over a temperature range from 75 to 1200 F, the Thermold J, from 75 to llOO F, and the other alloys from 75 to lOOO F. In all of the test alloys, the strength properties and moduli of elasticity decreased with increasing temperatures. The strength properties of the Thermold j, Type 420, Type 422, and 17-22 A (S) tended to decrease by varying amounts with increasing exposure times at the higher test temperatures. These decreases in strength are believed to be associated with structural changes produced by tempering. At lower temperatures, the properties of these materials did not vary significantly with exposure time, indicating that the structures were stable at those temperatures. The strength properties of the A-286 alloy and themore » 17-7 PH (RH 950) stainless varied somewhat erratically with increasing exposure times at the higher test temperatures as a result, probably, of aging phenomena in both of these precipitation-hardening alloys. The simple ratio relationships between various properties under equivalent test conditions were approximately equal in magnitude and in consistency to those previously determined for other materials and reported in WADC Technical Report 56-340. For the ertire ranges of materials and conditions used in this work, the consiatency of the various property relationships ranged from plus or minus l7% to plus or minus 71%. Precise data on the mechanical properties of aircraft-structural materials can be obtained only by testing under the desired condition. (auth)« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, Ala.
OSTI Identifier:
4317464
Report Number(s):
WADC-TR-58-365
NSA Number:
NSA-13-002194
DOE Contract Number:
AF33(616)-3876
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Project title: MATERIALS ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION TECHNIQUES; Task title: DESIGN DATA FOR METALS. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
METALLURGY AND CERAMICS; AIRCRAFT; BEARINGS; BUILDING MATERIALS; CARBON STEELS; ELASTICITY; HARDNESS; HEAT TREATMENTS; HIGH TEMPERATURE; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; PRECIPITATION; QUENCHING; SHEAR; SHEETS; STAINLESS STEELS; STEELS; TEMPERATURE; TENSILE PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Kattus, J.R., Preston, J.B., and Lessley, H.L. DETERMINATION OF TENSILE, COMPRESSIVE, BEARING, AND SHEAR PROPERTIES OF SHEET STEELS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. Period covered : January 1957 to May 1958. United States: N. p., 1958. Web.
Kattus, J.R., Preston, J.B., & Lessley, H.L. DETERMINATION OF TENSILE, COMPRESSIVE, BEARING, AND SHEAR PROPERTIES OF SHEET STEELS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. Period covered : January 1957 to May 1958. United States.
Kattus, J.R., Preston, J.B., and Lessley, H.L. Mon . "DETERMINATION OF TENSILE, COMPRESSIVE, BEARING, AND SHEAR PROPERTIES OF SHEET STEELS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. Period covered : January 1957 to May 1958". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_4317464,
title = {DETERMINATION OF TENSILE, COMPRESSIVE, BEARING, AND SHEAR PROPERTIES OF SHEET STEELS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. Period covered : January 1957 to May 1958},
author = {Kattus, J.R. and Preston, J.B. and Lessley, H.L.},
abstractNote = {The tensile, compressive, bearing, and shear properties of the following sheet metals were determined at various temperatures after exposure times of from1/2 hour tc 1000 hours at the test temperature: A-286 austeaitic alloy, quenched and tempered; 17-7 PH stain less steel, RH 950 condition; Thermold J alloy steel, quenched and tempered; Type 420 stainless steel, quenched and tempered; Type 422 stainless steel, quenched and tempered; and 17-22 A (S) alloy steel, quenched and tempered. The A-286 alloy was tested over a temperature range from 75 to 1200 F, the Thermold J, from 75 to llOO F, and the other alloys from 75 to lOOO F. In all of the test alloys, the strength properties and moduli of elasticity decreased with increasing temperatures. The strength properties of the Thermold j, Type 420, Type 422, and 17-22 A (S) tended to decrease by varying amounts with increasing exposure times at the higher test temperatures. These decreases in strength are believed to be associated with structural changes produced by tempering. At lower temperatures, the properties of these materials did not vary significantly with exposure time, indicating that the structures were stable at those temperatures. The strength properties of the A-286 alloy and the 17-7 PH (RH 950) stainless varied somewhat erratically with increasing exposure times at the higher test temperatures as a result, probably, of aging phenomena in both of these precipitation-hardening alloys. The simple ratio relationships between various properties under equivalent test conditions were approximately equal in magnitude and in consistency to those previously determined for other materials and reported in WADC Technical Report 56-340. For the ertire ranges of materials and conditions used in this work, the consiatency of the various property relationships ranged from plus or minus l7% to plus or minus 71%. Precise data on the mechanical properties of aircraft-structural materials can be obtained only by testing under the desired condition. (auth)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1958},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1958}
}

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