skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Ethanolic fermentation of pentoses in lignocellulose hydrolysates

Abstract

In the fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates to ethanol, two major problems are encountered: the fermentation of the pentose sugar xylose, and the presence of microbial inhibitors. Xylose can be directly fermented with yeasts; such as Pachysolen tannophilus, Candida shehatae, and Pichia stipis, or by isomerization of xylose to xylulose with the enzyme glucose (xylose) isomerase, and subsequent fermentation with bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The direct fermentation requires low, carefully controlled oxygenation, as well as the removal of inhibitors. Also, the xylose-fermenting yeasts have a limited ethanol tolerance. The combined isomerization and fermentation with XI and S. cerevisiae gives yields and productivities comparable to those obtained in hexose fermentations without oxygenation and removal of inhibitors. However, the enzyme is not very stable in a lignocellulose hydrolysate, and S. cerevisiae has a poorly developed pentose phosphate shunt. Different strategies involving strain adaptation, and protein and genetic engineering adopted to overcome these different obstacles, are discussed.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Lund Univ. Chemical Center (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Badger Engineers, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States); Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
431574
Report Number(s):
CONF-900512-
TRN: 96:006510-0012
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12. symposium on biotechnology fuels and chemicals, Gatlinburg, TN (United States), 7-11 May 1990; Other Information: PBD: 1991; Related Information: Is Part Of Twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals; Greenbaum, E. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]; Wyman, C.E. [ed.] [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States)]; PB: 934 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; XYLOSE; FERMENTATION; ISOMERIZATION; YEASTS; METABOLISM; BIOTECHNOLOGY; ETHANOL; GENETIC ENGINEERING; PENTOSES; SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; TOLERANCE; ENZYME ACTIVITY; ISOMERASES

Citation Formats

Hahn-Haegerdal, B, Linden, T, Senac, T, and Skoog, K. Ethanolic fermentation of pentoses in lignocellulose hydrolysates. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Hahn-Haegerdal, B, Linden, T, Senac, T, & Skoog, K. Ethanolic fermentation of pentoses in lignocellulose hydrolysates. United States.
Hahn-Haegerdal, B, Linden, T, Senac, T, and Skoog, K. Tue . "Ethanolic fermentation of pentoses in lignocellulose hydrolysates". United States.
@article{osti_431574,
title = {Ethanolic fermentation of pentoses in lignocellulose hydrolysates},
author = {Hahn-Haegerdal, B and Linden, T and Senac, T and Skoog, K},
abstractNote = {In the fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates to ethanol, two major problems are encountered: the fermentation of the pentose sugar xylose, and the presence of microbial inhibitors. Xylose can be directly fermented with yeasts; such as Pachysolen tannophilus, Candida shehatae, and Pichia stipis, or by isomerization of xylose to xylulose with the enzyme glucose (xylose) isomerase, and subsequent fermentation with bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The direct fermentation requires low, carefully controlled oxygenation, as well as the removal of inhibitors. Also, the xylose-fermenting yeasts have a limited ethanol tolerance. The combined isomerization and fermentation with XI and S. cerevisiae gives yields and productivities comparable to those obtained in hexose fermentations without oxygenation and removal of inhibitors. However, the enzyme is not very stable in a lignocellulose hydrolysate, and S. cerevisiae has a poorly developed pentose phosphate shunt. Different strategies involving strain adaptation, and protein and genetic engineering adopted to overcome these different obstacles, are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: