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Title: Development of a differential volume reactor system for soil biodegradation studies

Abstract

A bench scale experimental system was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation by mixed microbial cultures in PAH contaminated Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) soils and on sand. The reactor system was chosen in order to provide a fundamental protocol capable for evaluating the performance of specific mixed microbial cultures on specific soil systems by elucidating the important system variables and their interactions. The reactor design and peripherals are described. A plug flow differential volume reactor (DVR) was used in order to remove performance effects related to reactor type, as opposed to system structure. This reactor system could be well represented mathematically. Methods were developed for on-line quantitative determination of PAH liquid phase concentrations. The mathematical models and experimental data are presented for the biodegradation of naphthalene on artificial and MGP soils.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Badger Engineers, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States); Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
431565
Report Number(s):
CONF-900512-
CNN: Grant 5086-260-1303(c); TRN: 96:006510-0002
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12. symposium on biotechnology fuels and chemicals, Gatlinburg, TN (United States), 7-11 May 1990; Other Information: PBD: 1991; Related Information: Is Part Of Twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals; Greenbaum, E. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]; Wyman, C.E. [ed.] [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (United States)]; PB: 934 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; NAPHTHALENE; BIODEGRADATION; SOILS; REMEDIAL ACTION; TOWN GAS; PRODUCTION; BIOTECHNOLOGY; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS

Citation Formats

Webb, O.F., Bienkowski, P.R., and Reed, G.D. Development of a differential volume reactor system for soil biodegradation studies. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Webb, O.F., Bienkowski, P.R., & Reed, G.D. Development of a differential volume reactor system for soil biodegradation studies. United States.
Webb, O.F., Bienkowski, P.R., and Reed, G.D. 1991. "Development of a differential volume reactor system for soil biodegradation studies". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_431565,
title = {Development of a differential volume reactor system for soil biodegradation studies},
author = {Webb, O.F. and Bienkowski, P.R. and Reed, G.D.},
abstractNote = {A bench scale experimental system was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation by mixed microbial cultures in PAH contaminated Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) soils and on sand. The reactor system was chosen in order to provide a fundamental protocol capable for evaluating the performance of specific mixed microbial cultures on specific soil systems by elucidating the important system variables and their interactions. The reactor design and peripherals are described. A plug flow differential volume reactor (DVR) was used in order to remove performance effects related to reactor type, as opposed to system structure. This reactor system could be well represented mathematically. Methods were developed for on-line quantitative determination of PAH liquid phase concentrations. The mathematical models and experimental data are presented for the biodegradation of naphthalene on artificial and MGP soils.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month =
}

Conference:
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