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Title: GEOLOGY AND URANIUM-VANADIUM DEPOSITS OF THE SLICK ROCK DISTRICT, SAN MIGUEL AND DOLORES COUNTIES, COLORADO

Abstract

Sedimantary rocks known in the Slick Rock district in southwestern Colorado rande in age from Devonian (?) to Cretaceous, and aggregate about 13,000 feet in maximum thickness. Important uranium-vanadium production has come from deposits in the Salt Wash memeber of the Morrison formation of Late Jurassic age. Detrital hematite, magnetite, and ilmenite in rocks of the Morrison formation not affected by epigenetic alternation contain appreciable amounts of several of the elements found in the ore deposits. Epigenetic alteration processes have bleached large volumes of rock and largely spatially associated with the Dolores fault zone. Most of the known ore deposits are in the north part of the Slick Rock district in a belt called the Dolores ore zone. The zone lies along the Dolores fault zone but is wider than the fault zone. All known deposits are associated with abundant carbonaceous plant material. Uraniumvanadium deposits in the district are chiefly tabular to lenticular and are roughly parallel to the sedimentary bedding. Some ore bodies, however, are narrow, elongate, and curve sharply across bedding; these bodies have been called rolls'' by the miners. Mineral zoning is evident in some roll bodies; carbonates, geothite (altered from pyrite), selenides, and sulfides are commonlymore » found in concentric layres at the concave edge of rolls. This zoning, and the relationship of roll ore bodies to sedimentary structures and lithology, suggest that ore was deposited at an interface between two solutions, possibly cool connate water and a warmer ore solution. On a district scale, copper and lead are distinctly most abundant in the ore deposits within and immediately adjacent ot the Dolores fault zone, and less Uranium-vanadium djeposits in the district occur only in sandstone that is considered to be epigenetically altered, water, heated and set into circulation near the end of Cretaceous time by igneous intrusions in the La Sal and other centers on the Colorado Plateau, picked up elements from sedimentary rocks where they had been faulted and fractured, and deposited the elements at solution interfaces where accumulations of carbonaceous material provided favorable chemical conditions for precipitation. (auth)« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Geological Survey, Grand Junction, Colo.
OSTI Identifier:
4308700
Report Number(s):
A/CONF.15/P/771
NSA Number:
NSA-12-014776
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Prepared for the Second U.N. International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, 1958. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-58
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English
Subject:
MINERALOGY, METALLURGY, AND CERAMICS; CARBONATES; DECOMPOSITION; DEPOSITS; GEOLOGY; GOETHITE; GROUND WATER; HEMATITE; IGNEOUS ROCKS; ILMENITE; IRON HYDROXIDES; IRON OXIDES; IRON SULFIDES; LAYERS; MAGNETITE; MINERALS; MINING; ORES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PRECIPITATION; PYRITE; ROCKS; SAND; SELENIDES; SOLUTIONS; SULFIDES; TITANIUM OXIDES; URANIUM MINERALS; VANADIUM COMPOUNDS; WATER

Citation Formats

Shawe, D R, Archbold, N L, and Simmons, G C. GEOLOGY AND URANIUM-VANADIUM DEPOSITS OF THE SLICK ROCK DISTRICT, SAN MIGUEL AND DOLORES COUNTIES, COLORADO. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 1958. Web.
Shawe, D R, Archbold, N L, & Simmons, G C. GEOLOGY AND URANIUM-VANADIUM DEPOSITS OF THE SLICK ROCK DISTRICT, SAN MIGUEL AND DOLORES COUNTIES, COLORADO. Country unknown/Code not available.
Shawe, D R, Archbold, N L, and Simmons, G C. Fri . "GEOLOGY AND URANIUM-VANADIUM DEPOSITS OF THE SLICK ROCK DISTRICT, SAN MIGUEL AND DOLORES COUNTIES, COLORADO". Country unknown/Code not available.
@article{osti_4308700,
title = {GEOLOGY AND URANIUM-VANADIUM DEPOSITS OF THE SLICK ROCK DISTRICT, SAN MIGUEL AND DOLORES COUNTIES, COLORADO},
author = {Shawe, D R and Archbold, N L and Simmons, G C},
abstractNote = {Sedimantary rocks known in the Slick Rock district in southwestern Colorado rande in age from Devonian (?) to Cretaceous, and aggregate about 13,000 feet in maximum thickness. Important uranium-vanadium production has come from deposits in the Salt Wash memeber of the Morrison formation of Late Jurassic age. Detrital hematite, magnetite, and ilmenite in rocks of the Morrison formation not affected by epigenetic alternation contain appreciable amounts of several of the elements found in the ore deposits. Epigenetic alteration processes have bleached large volumes of rock and largely spatially associated with the Dolores fault zone. Most of the known ore deposits are in the north part of the Slick Rock district in a belt called the Dolores ore zone. The zone lies along the Dolores fault zone but is wider than the fault zone. All known deposits are associated with abundant carbonaceous plant material. Uraniumvanadium deposits in the district are chiefly tabular to lenticular and are roughly parallel to the sedimentary bedding. Some ore bodies, however, are narrow, elongate, and curve sharply across bedding; these bodies have been called rolls'' by the miners. Mineral zoning is evident in some roll bodies; carbonates, geothite (altered from pyrite), selenides, and sulfides are commonly found in concentric layres at the concave edge of rolls. This zoning, and the relationship of roll ore bodies to sedimentary structures and lithology, suggest that ore was deposited at an interface between two solutions, possibly cool connate water and a warmer ore solution. On a district scale, copper and lead are distinctly most abundant in the ore deposits within and immediately adjacent ot the Dolores fault zone, and less Uranium-vanadium djeposits in the district occur only in sandstone that is considered to be epigenetically altered, water, heated and set into circulation near the end of Cretaceous time by igneous intrusions in the La Sal and other centers on the Colorado Plateau, picked up elements from sedimentary rocks where they had been faulted and fractured, and deposited the elements at solution interfaces where accumulations of carbonaceous material provided favorable chemical conditions for precipitation. (auth)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {1958},
month = {10}
}

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