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Title: INVESTIGATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE RESISTANT MATERIALS. Quarterly Report No. 13 for November 1, 1958 to January 31, 1959

Abstract

The exhaust gas conditions of the oxyhydrogen rocket motor permit a severe test on an exposed sample in the gas stream. The theoretical veloclty in the exit plane is 790O ft/sec, with a theoretical temperature of 3200 R. These conditions enable stagnation temperatures in ex cess of 5500 R to be produced. The calculated heat transfer rate in the staguation area of a sphericalshaped bedy ln the exhaust gas of the oxyhydrogen rocket motor is 1818 Btu/sec-ft/sup 2/ maintaining a surface temperature of 2000 F. For a body with a radius of 1/2 inch, the heat transfer is 19.8 Btu/sec. This indicates that an internal cooling system would be feasible. A device was designed for ejecting coolant on the stagnation area of a small axially syrometrlc blunt body and initial tests were begun with fused silica samples. Pigment grade titania powder was prepared for flame spraying by sintering in alr at 2000 F for 2.5 hours. This powder produced rather soft, gray coatings. These coatings had excellent impact resistance when the thickness was less than 2.5 mils, the particle size of the sprayed powder between 270 and 325 mesh, and the substrate temperature held below 150 C during spraying. Thesemore » oxygen-deficient coatings turned back to the orlginal white color of the powder when they were heated to a red heat with an oxygen-rich flame. The reheated coatings were much harder bat flaked off on cooling unless the thickness was greater than 20 mils. The 20mil coatings had poor impact resistance. A base coat of aluminum increased the impact resistance of these reheated coatings significantly. Coatings having a base coat of aluminum 5.5 mils thick and an outer coat of titania 4.0 mils thick remained intact after one thermal cycle to 1500 F in air. An attempt to control the extreme reactions of the beryllium-tungsten trioxide thermite reactions was made. Beryllia was used as the throttling material. Thermets composed of approximately 50% beryllluna -nlckel monoxide thermite and 50% beryllia look promising for further investigation. Studies were continued wlth the beryllium -chromic oxide thermite for possible use in forming thermet compacts. Powdered chromium was added in varying percentages as the throttllng material. Thermet compacts of 40% thermite and 60% chromium when ignited in air or argon produced test specimens with no distortion, no apparent oxidation of chromium, and low porosity. (For preceding period see NP-7117.) (auth)« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta. Engineering Experiment Station
OSTI Identifier:
4286904
Report Number(s):
NP-7321; Project No. A-212
NSA Number:
NSA-13-010041
DOE Contract Number:  
NORD-15701
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Project No. A-212. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
METALLURGY AND CERAMICS; AIR; ALLOYS; ALUMINUM; ARGON; BERYLLIUM; BERYLLIUM OXIDES; CERMETS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHROMIUM OXIDES; COATING; COLOR; COMBUSTION; COMPACTING; CONFIGURATION; CONTROL; COOLING; FAILURES; FUSED SALTS; GAS FLOW; GRAIN SIZE; HARDNESS; HEAT RESISTING METALS; HEAT TRANSFER; HEAT TREATMENTS; HIGH TEMPERATURE; HYDROGEN; IMPACT SHOCK; INERT GASES; MATERIALS TESTING; METALLURGY; NICKEL OXIDES; NUMERICALS; OXYGEN; PIGMENTS; PLANNING; POROSITY; POWDERS; PREPARATION; REDUCTION; ROCKETS; SAMPLING; SILICON OXIDES; SINTERING; SPHERES; SPUTTERING; STABILITY; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE; THERMITE PROCESS; THERMODYNAMICS; THICKNESS; TITANIUM OXIDES; TUNGSTEN OXIDES

Citation Formats

Mason, C R, Walton, J D, Bowen, M D, and Teague, W T. INVESTIGATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE RESISTANT MATERIALS. Quarterly Report No. 13 for November 1, 1958 to January 31, 1959. United States: N. p., 1959. Web.
Mason, C R, Walton, J D, Bowen, M D, & Teague, W T. INVESTIGATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE RESISTANT MATERIALS. Quarterly Report No. 13 for November 1, 1958 to January 31, 1959. United States.
Mason, C R, Walton, J D, Bowen, M D, and Teague, W T. Sat . "INVESTIGATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE RESISTANT MATERIALS. Quarterly Report No. 13 for November 1, 1958 to January 31, 1959". United States.
@article{osti_4286904,
title = {INVESTIGATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE RESISTANT MATERIALS. Quarterly Report No. 13 for November 1, 1958 to January 31, 1959},
author = {Mason, C R and Walton, J D and Bowen, M D and Teague, W T},
abstractNote = {The exhaust gas conditions of the oxyhydrogen rocket motor permit a severe test on an exposed sample in the gas stream. The theoretical veloclty in the exit plane is 790O ft/sec, with a theoretical temperature of 3200 R. These conditions enable stagnation temperatures in ex cess of 5500 R to be produced. The calculated heat transfer rate in the staguation area of a sphericalshaped bedy ln the exhaust gas of the oxyhydrogen rocket motor is 1818 Btu/sec-ft/sup 2/ maintaining a surface temperature of 2000 F. For a body with a radius of 1/2 inch, the heat transfer is 19.8 Btu/sec. This indicates that an internal cooling system would be feasible. A device was designed for ejecting coolant on the stagnation area of a small axially syrometrlc blunt body and initial tests were begun with fused silica samples. Pigment grade titania powder was prepared for flame spraying by sintering in alr at 2000 F for 2.5 hours. This powder produced rather soft, gray coatings. These coatings had excellent impact resistance when the thickness was less than 2.5 mils, the particle size of the sprayed powder between 270 and 325 mesh, and the substrate temperature held below 150 C during spraying. These oxygen-deficient coatings turned back to the orlginal white color of the powder when they were heated to a red heat with an oxygen-rich flame. The reheated coatings were much harder bat flaked off on cooling unless the thickness was greater than 20 mils. The 20mil coatings had poor impact resistance. A base coat of aluminum increased the impact resistance of these reheated coatings significantly. Coatings having a base coat of aluminum 5.5 mils thick and an outer coat of titania 4.0 mils thick remained intact after one thermal cycle to 1500 F in air. An attempt to control the extreme reactions of the beryllium-tungsten trioxide thermite reactions was made. Beryllia was used as the throttling material. Thermets composed of approximately 50% beryllluna -nlckel monoxide thermite and 50% beryllia look promising for further investigation. Studies were continued wlth the beryllium -chromic oxide thermite for possible use in forming thermet compacts. Powdered chromium was added in varying percentages as the throttllng material. Thermet compacts of 40% thermite and 60% chromium when ignited in air or argon produced test specimens with no distortion, no apparent oxidation of chromium, and low porosity. (For preceding period see NP-7117.) (auth)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/4286904}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1959},
month = {10}
}

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