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Title: FORGING CHARACTERISTICS AND PROPERTIES OF HM21XA AND EK31XA MAGNESIUM ALLOY PRODUCTION FORGINGS. Period covered : May 16, 1957 to June 30, 1958

Abstract

This production closed-die forging program was established for the purpose of determining the forging characteriatics and properties of two high- temperature magnesium alloys, HM21XA and EK31XA, in five sets of commercial design tools. Both cast and extruded material was used as forging stock. Teat specimens for room and elevated temperature testing were taken from the forgings in normal production test locations after the HM21XA forgings were aged to the - T5 temper and the EK31XA forgings were heat treated to the -T6 condition. EK31XA alloy is readily forgeable in regular hydraulic presses and the Air Force heavy presses with stock temperatures of 750 to 950 deg F and die temperatures of 700 to 850 deg F. HM21XA alloy is relatively stiff to forge in this temperature range and the alley is also susceptible to cracking when subjected to bending moments during the forging cycle. The cast forms of both alloys are slightly stiffer to forge than the extruded forms. The strength properties and creep resistance of EK3lXA,-T6 production forgings are outstanding st temperatures to 500 deg F. Properties of HM21XA-T5 forgings, although lower than anticipated st moderste temperatures, duplicate those obtained on laboratory muterial at the higher testing temperatures. Optimummore » properties are obtained in this alloy by strain hardering and maintaining the Mn content at about 0.60%. Modulus, shear, bearing, and fatigue properties for both alloys are presented at appropriate testing temperatures. (auth)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich.
OSTI Identifier:
4276175
Report Number(s):
WADC-TR-58-218; AD-204797
NSA Number:
NSA-13-005582
DOE Contract Number:
AF33-(616)-3578
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Project title: METALLIC MATERIALS. Task title: IMPROVED MAGNESIUM ALLOYS. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
METALLURGY AND CERAMICS; CASTING; CRACKS; CREEP; DEFORMATION; EFFICIENCY; ELASTICITY; EXTRUSION; FATIGUE; FORGING; HEAT TREATMENTS; HIGH TEMPERATURE; HYDRAULICS; MAGNESIUM ALLOYS; MATERIALS TESTING; PLANNING; PRESSURE; SHEAR; STABILITY; TEMPERATURE; TEMPERING; TENSILE PROPERTIES; TOOLS

Citation Formats

Pashak, J.F. FORGING CHARACTERISTICS AND PROPERTIES OF HM21XA AND EK31XA MAGNESIUM ALLOY PRODUCTION FORGINGS. Period covered : May 16, 1957 to June 30, 1958. United States: N. p., 1958. Web.
Pashak, J.F. FORGING CHARACTERISTICS AND PROPERTIES OF HM21XA AND EK31XA MAGNESIUM ALLOY PRODUCTION FORGINGS. Period covered : May 16, 1957 to June 30, 1958. United States.
Pashak, J.F. Sun . "FORGING CHARACTERISTICS AND PROPERTIES OF HM21XA AND EK31XA MAGNESIUM ALLOY PRODUCTION FORGINGS. Period covered : May 16, 1957 to June 30, 1958". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_4276175,
title = {FORGING CHARACTERISTICS AND PROPERTIES OF HM21XA AND EK31XA MAGNESIUM ALLOY PRODUCTION FORGINGS. Period covered : May 16, 1957 to June 30, 1958},
author = {Pashak, J.F.},
abstractNote = {This production closed-die forging program was established for the purpose of determining the forging characteriatics and properties of two high- temperature magnesium alloys, HM21XA and EK31XA, in five sets of commercial design tools. Both cast and extruded material was used as forging stock. Teat specimens for room and elevated temperature testing were taken from the forgings in normal production test locations after the HM21XA forgings were aged to the - T5 temper and the EK31XA forgings were heat treated to the -T6 condition. EK31XA alloy is readily forgeable in regular hydraulic presses and the Air Force heavy presses with stock temperatures of 750 to 950 deg F and die temperatures of 700 to 850 deg F. HM21XA alloy is relatively stiff to forge in this temperature range and the alley is also susceptible to cracking when subjected to bending moments during the forging cycle. The cast forms of both alloys are slightly stiffer to forge than the extruded forms. The strength properties and creep resistance of EK3lXA,-T6 production forgings are outstanding st temperatures to 500 deg F. Properties of HM21XA-T5 forgings, although lower than anticipated st moderste temperatures, duplicate those obtained on laboratory muterial at the higher testing temperatures. Optimum properties are obtained in this alloy by strain hardering and maintaining the Mn content at about 0.60%. Modulus, shear, bearing, and fatigue properties for both alloys are presented at appropriate testing temperatures. (auth)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 1958},
month = {Sun Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 1958}
}

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  • This laboratory forging program was established for the purpose of selecting the best Mg alloy or alloys for elevated temperature service. The alloys investigated were three Mg--Th alloys (HM21XA, HK31A, HZ32A) and four Mg-- RE alloys (EK31(M), EZ33A, EK31(Di), EM41XA); two commercial alloys (AZ80A, ZK6OA) were included for comparative purposes. Both cast ingot and extruded billet were used as forging stock. Static properties and creep resistance of the alloys were determined on forged discs of 90% reduction. The data, therefore, cannot be considered as representative of die forgings. Of the alloys investigated, HM21XA-T5 exhibits the best combination of properties inmore » the range of 500 to 7O0 deg F while EK31XA-T6 presents the optimum values at 70 to 500 deg F. Pre-forging cast ingot has no significant effect on the properties of forgings when the final forging reduction is as great as 75%; however, increasing preforging temperature has a deleterious effect on the final forged properties. Evaluation of closed die forgings produced on a 3000 ton press show that ease of forging (die filling) increases in the following order: HM21XA, HK31A, EK31(Di), commercial alloy AZ80A and ZK60A. Temperature and pressure requirements to fill the die for a given alloy increase as the draft angle (7 deg , 3 deg , 0 deg ) decreases. (auth)« less
  • A program was conducted to examine the high temperature strength and deformation characteristics of two high-strength airframe alloys when subjected to a variety of stresses under both short and long time loading. Specifically the object of the program was to determine the high-temperature tension, compression, bearing, and shear properties of selected airframe alloys with the ultimate purpose of correlating tension behaving with behavior under the various other types of loads and applying these basic data to predict the behavior of rivetod joints undergoing creep deformation in tension, bearing, and shear. Data summarized in tabular and chart form of the highmore » temperature properties of PH15-7 Mo stainless steel and 6A1-4V titanium alloy in tension, compression, bearing, and shear are given. In addition, correlations of the tensile creep- rupture properties with corresponding compression, bearing, and shear creep- rupture properties are presented. The creep-rupture characteristics of doubler- type riveted joints, which represent single units of a multiple riveted assembly, prepared from the test alloys are presented. Correlations between measured joint creeprupture and predicted joint creep-rupture are also included. (auth)« less
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