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Title: A STUDY OF REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR SEAL AND BEARING APPLICATIONS IN AIRCRAFT ACCESSORY UNITS AND ROCKET MOTORS. Period Covered: March 1, 1957 to February 28, 1958

Abstract

A number of ceramic, cermet, and high-temperature alloy materials have been evaluatod for corrosion resistance and for friction and wear behavior in an oxidizing atmosphere from 1000 to 1800 deg F. Rubbing-wear experiments were conducted at 200 feet per second sliding speed with about 20-psi load pressure usualiy applied to the contact sunfaces. Several material combinations involving an alumina--chromium--molybdenum cermet, silicon carbide, alumina, and perhaps a titauium carbide--nickel--molybdenum cermet may be satisfactory for short-life rubbing-seal applicstions under these conditions. The applications of these materials are limitod since they wear rapidly and exhibit erratic frictional behavior. Superficial sunface cracking was observed on the wear surfaces of all specimens containing brittle ceramic phases except possibly silicon carbide. A wear-failure mechanism for refractory materials under sliding contact is postulated, and some correlation of the experimental results with conventional thermal-stress-resistance parameters is obtained. Two rubbing-wear experiments were consucted in a high-temperature reducing atmosphere. The static corrosion resistance of several potential bearing and seal materials was determined in a nitric acid oxidizer used in some rocket-propellant pumps. Experimental ceramic and cermet materials were fabricated, and some of these specimens were evalusted in rubbingwear experiments in the oxidizing atmosphere to study certain material- property effects onmore » friction and wear behavior. (auth)« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, Ohio
OSTI Identifier:
4273816
Report Number(s):
WADC-TR-58-299; AD-203787
NSA Number:
NSA-13-005583
DOE Contract Number:
AF33(616)-3995
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Project title: CERAMIC AND CERMET MATERIALS. Task title: CERAMIC AND CERMET MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT. Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-59
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
METALLURGY AND CERAMICS; ALUMINUM OXIDES; ATMOSPHERE; BEARINGS; BRITTLENESS; CERAMICS; CERMETS; CHROMIUM; CORROSION; CRACKS; FAILURES; FRICTION; HIGH TEMPERATURE; MATERIALS TESTING; MIXING; MOLYBDENUM; NICKEL; NITRIC ACID; OXIDATION; PHASE DIAGRAMS; PRESSURE; PROPULSION; PUMPS; REDUCTION; REFRACTORIES; ROCKETS; SEALS; SILICON CARBIDES; STABILITY; SURFACES; TEMPERATURE; THERMAL STRESSES; TITANIUM CARBIDES; USES; VELOCITY; WEAR

Citation Formats

Sibley, L.B., Allen, C.M., Zielenbach, W.J., Peterson, C.L., and Goldthwaite, W.H. A STUDY OF REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR SEAL AND BEARING APPLICATIONS IN AIRCRAFT ACCESSORY UNITS AND ROCKET MOTORS. Period Covered: March 1, 1957 to February 28, 1958. United States: N. p., 1958. Web.
Sibley, L.B., Allen, C.M., Zielenbach, W.J., Peterson, C.L., & Goldthwaite, W.H. A STUDY OF REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR SEAL AND BEARING APPLICATIONS IN AIRCRAFT ACCESSORY UNITS AND ROCKET MOTORS. Period Covered: March 1, 1957 to February 28, 1958. United States.
Sibley, L.B., Allen, C.M., Zielenbach, W.J., Peterson, C.L., and Goldthwaite, W.H. Tue . "A STUDY OF REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR SEAL AND BEARING APPLICATIONS IN AIRCRAFT ACCESSORY UNITS AND ROCKET MOTORS. Period Covered: March 1, 1957 to February 28, 1958". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_4273816,
title = {A STUDY OF REFRACTORY MATERIALS FOR SEAL AND BEARING APPLICATIONS IN AIRCRAFT ACCESSORY UNITS AND ROCKET MOTORS. Period Covered: March 1, 1957 to February 28, 1958},
author = {Sibley, L.B. and Allen, C.M. and Zielenbach, W.J. and Peterson, C.L. and Goldthwaite, W.H.},
abstractNote = {A number of ceramic, cermet, and high-temperature alloy materials have been evaluatod for corrosion resistance and for friction and wear behavior in an oxidizing atmosphere from 1000 to 1800 deg F. Rubbing-wear experiments were conducted at 200 feet per second sliding speed with about 20-psi load pressure usualiy applied to the contact sunfaces. Several material combinations involving an alumina--chromium--molybdenum cermet, silicon carbide, alumina, and perhaps a titauium carbide--nickel--molybdenum cermet may be satisfactory for short-life rubbing-seal applicstions under these conditions. The applications of these materials are limitod since they wear rapidly and exhibit erratic frictional behavior. Superficial sunface cracking was observed on the wear surfaces of all specimens containing brittle ceramic phases except possibly silicon carbide. A wear-failure mechanism for refractory materials under sliding contact is postulated, and some correlation of the experimental results with conventional thermal-stress-resistance parameters is obtained. Two rubbing-wear experiments were consucted in a high-temperature reducing atmosphere. The static corrosion resistance of several potential bearing and seal materials was determined in a nitric acid oxidizer used in some rocket-propellant pumps. Experimental ceramic and cermet materials were fabricated, and some of these specimens were evalusted in rubbingwear experiments in the oxidizing atmosphere to study certain material- property effects on friction and wear behavior. (auth)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1958},
month = {Tue Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1958}
}

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